Namib desert

WWF Abstract

Nicknamed the worldÂ’s oldest desert, the Namib stretches along the coast of Namibia to form one of the most spectacular and richest deserts in the world. Gently sloping toward the Atlantic Ocean, it is patterned by a sea of giant red sand dunes, some that reach 1000 feet (305 m) high. Because of its long, stable climate over time, a number of species boast ancient origins. Others have evolved unusual adaptations to survive in the extremely harsh environment.
Read more: View WWF Report
Ecozone:Afrotropic
Biome:Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Countries:Namibia
Area:19,967,998 acres (8,080,762 hectares)
Species:All  Endangered  Invasive
Climate:View Climate Data
Land Use:View Land Use Data

Protected Areas

Namib-Naukluft National Park
Skeleton Coast Game Park
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 gis.wwfus.org/wildfinder