Mojave desert

WWF Abstract

The Mojave is a "high desert" because it occurs largely at higher elevations, but the ecoregion as a whole ranges from below sea level to over 5,280 feet (1,600 m). The famous Death Valley lies at 482 feet (146 m) below sea level. The Mojave is the smallest of the four North American deserts. It receives between 2.6 and 7.6 inches (65 and 190 mm) of precipitation each year. Dry lakes are common in this landscape.
Read more: View WWF Report
Ecozone:Nearctic
Biome:Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Countries:United States
Area:32,256,000 acres (13,053,540 hectares)
Species:All  Endangered  Invasive
Climate:View Climate Data
Land Use:View Land Use Data

Protected Areas

Big Morongo Canyon Preserve Area of Critical Environmental Concern
Death Valley National Park
Grand Canyon National Park
Hamilton Preserve Nature Conservancy - Preserve
Joshua Tree National Park
Lake Mead National Recreation Area
Mojave and Colorado Deserts Biosphere Reserve
San Dimas Biosphere Reserve
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER