Animalia > Mollusca > Cephalopoda > Octopoda > Octopodoidea > Octopodidae > Octopus > Octopus bimaculatus
 

Octopus bimaculatus (california two-spot octopus)

Wikipedia Abstract

Octopus bimaculatus, the California two-spot octopus or Verrill's two-spot octopus, is an octopus common in the subtidal and intertidal zone of Southern California. It is often confused with the related species Octopus bimaculoides, and the common name "California two-spot octopus" is often applied to both species.
View Wikipedia Record: Octopus bimaculatus

Prey / Diet

Americardia biangulata (western strawberry-cockle)[1]
Bulla gouldiana (California bubble)[1]
Chione undatella[2]
Crassadoma gigantea (giant rock-scallop)[1]
Crepipatella lingulata (pacific half-slippersnail)[1]
Diplodonta orbella (orb diplodon)[1]
Dosinia juvenilis (frilled venus)[1]
Epilucina californica (California lucine)[1]
Haliotis corrugata (pink abalone)[1]
Haliotis cracherodii (black abalone)[1]
Haliotis fulgens (green abalone)[1]
Haliotis rufescens (red abalone)[1]
Hemisquilla ensigera (Mantis shrimp)[1]
Kelletia kelletii (Kellet's whelk)[1]
Leukoma staminea (Pacific littleneck)[1]
Limaria hemphilli (phemphill fileclam)[1]
Megastraea undosa (wavy turban)[1]
Megathura crenulata (giant keyhole limpet)[1]
Microgadus proximus (Tommy cod)[2]
Myliobatis californica (Bat eagle ray)[1]
Mytilus californianus (California mussel)[1]
Nassarius tiarula (western mud nassa)[1]
Neobernaya spadicea (chestnut cowrie)[1]
Octopus bimaculatus (california two-spot octopus)[1]
Olivella biplicata (purple dwarf olive)[1]
Pachygrapsus crassipes (striped shore crab)[1]
Paguristes ulreyi (furry hermit)[2]
Panulirus interruptus (California spiny lobster)[1]
Paralabrax clathratus (Sea bass)[1]
Paraxanthias taylori (lumpy rubble crab)[1]
Phyllopagurus californica <Unverified Name>[1]
Pitar newcombianus (Newcomb pitar)[1]
Pomaulax gibberosus (red turban)[1]
Pusula solandri[2]
Semele decisa (clipped semele)[1]
Semele rupicola (rock semele)[1]
Stenoplax conspicua (Conspicuous Chiton)[1]
Tagelus californianus (California tagelus)[1]
Tegula aureotincta (gilded tegula)[1]
Tegula eiseni (banded tegula)[1]
Tegula funebralis (black tegula)[1]
Tegula gallina (speckled tegula)[1]
Tegula regina (queen tegula)[1]
Ventricolaria fordii <Unverified Name>[1]

Predators

Mirounga angustirostris (Northern Elephant Seal)[3]
Octopus bimaculatus (california two-spot octopus)[1]
Ophiodon elongatus (Lingcod)[4]
Phocoenoides dalli (Dall's Porpoise)[5]
Thunnus alalunga (longfinned albacore)[3]
Thunnus orientalis (Pacific bluefin tuna)[2]
Thunnus thynnus (horse mackerel)[3]
Uria aalge (Common Murre)[3]
Zalophus californianus (California Sealion)[1]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Dicyema sullivani[6]
Dicyemennea abelis[6]
Dicyemennea californica[6]
Dicyemennea granularis[6]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
John G. Shedd Aquarium

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1CephBase - Cephalopod (Octopus, Squid, Cuttlefish and Nautilus) Database 2Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics. 3Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository. 4Tinus, Craig A. (2012) Prey preference of lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus), a top marine predator: implications for ecosystem-based fisheries management. Fishery Bulletin, 110(2), pp. 193-204. 5Food Web Relationships of Northern Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca : a Synthesis of the Available Knowledge, Charles A. Simenstad, Bruce S. Miller, Carl F. Nyblade, Kathleen Thornburgh, and Lewis J. Bledsoe, EPA-600 7-29-259 September 1979 6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access