Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Ericales > Sapotaceae > Chrysophyllum > Chrysophyllum oliviforme
 

Chrysophyllum oliviforme (satinleaf)

Synonyms: Chrysophyllum oliviforme var. typicum; Cynodendron oliviforme; Dactimala oliviformis; Guersentia oliviformis

Wikipedia Abstract

Chrysophyllum oliviforme, commonly known as the Satinleaf, is a medium-sized tree native to Florida, the Bahamas, the Greater Antilles, and Belize. It is also known as Damson Plum, Wild Star-Apple, Saffron-tree, Caimitillo, Caimitillo de Perro, Camitillo Cimarró, Teta de Burra, Macanabo, and Caïmite Marron. It gets the name Satinleaf from the distinctive colors of the leaves. The top of the leaf is dark green while the bottom is light brown or copper.
View Wikipedia Record: Chrysophyllum oliviforme

Infraspecies

Attributes

Height [1]  32 feet (9.9 m)
Width [1]  20 feet (6.1 m)
Air Quality Improvement [1]  Low
Allergen Potential [1]  Low
Carbon Capture [1]  Low
Shade Percentage [1]  82 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Low
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 11 Low Temperature: 40 F° (4.4 C°) → 50 F° (10 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 11 Low Temperature: 40 F° (4.4 C°) → 50 F° (10 C°)
Water Use [1]  Moderate
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Specific Gravity [3]  0.77
Structure [2]  Tree

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Canaveral National Seashore II 9090 Florida, United States
Ciénaga de Zapata National Park 1606900 Cuba  
Everglades and Dry Tortugas Biosphere Reserve   Florida, United States  
Pico Mogote Ecological Reserve II 3698 Cuba  
Tuabaquey - Limones Ecological Reserve II 4859 Cuba  

Predators

Anastrepha suspensa (Caribbean fruit fly)[4]
Philephedra tuberculosa[5]
Pulvinaria psidii (green shield scale)[5]

Range Map

Florida to Caribbean; Florida, Caribbean;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database. 2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture 3Jérôme Chave, Helene C. Muller-Landau, Timothy R. Baker, Tomás A. Easdale, Hans ter Steege, Campbell O. Webb, 2006. Regional and phylogenetic variation of wood density across 2,456 neotropical tree species. Ecological Applications 16(6), 2356 - 2367 4Norrbom, A.L. 2004. Fruit fly (Tephritidae) host plant database. Version Nov, 2004. 5Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access