Animalia > Arthropoda > Arachnida > Ixodida > Ixodidae > Dermacentor > Dermacentor andersoni
 

Dermacentor andersoni (Rocky Mountain wood tick; Rocky Mountain-spotted fever tick)

Synonyms: Cynorhaestes venustus; Dermacentor andersoni; Dermacentor andersoni dermacentor; Dermacentor andersoni olenevia; Dermacentor andersoni venustus; Dermacentor modestus; Dermacentor venustus
Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

Dermacentor andersoni, commonly known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is a species of tick. It can cause tick paralysis. This tick is well known as a vector of the Rocky Mountain spotted fever rickettsia in the northwestern U.S. and Canada, the Colorado tick fever virus, and the bacteria which causes tularemia (hunter's disease).Diagnostic features: The larva only has three pairs of legs. The nymph has four pairs.
View Wikipedia Record: Dermacentor andersoni

Prey / Diet

Homo sapiens (man)[1]

Providers

Parasite of 
Callospermophilus lateralis (golden-mantled ground squirrel)[2]
Lepus townsendii (White-tailed Jackrabbit)[3]
Neotoma lepida (desert woodrat)[4]
Neotoma mexicana (Mexican woodrat)[5]
Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer)[6]
Perognathus fasciatus (olive-backed pocket mouse)[7]
Tamias minimus (least chipmunk)[8]
Tamias speciosus (lodgepole chipmunk)[9]
Urocitellus columbianus (Columbian ground squirrel)[10]
Ursus americanus (black bear)[6]

Distribution

Mexico;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
2Spermophilus lateralis, Molly A. Bartels and Doug P. Thompson, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 440, pp. 1-8 (1993)
3Lepus townsendii, Burton K. Lim, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 288, pp. 1-6 (1987)
4Neotoma lepida, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 699, pp. 1–12 (2002)
5Neotoma mexicana, John E. Cornely and Robert J. Baker, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 262, pp. 1-7 (1986)
6Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
7Perognathus fasciatus, Richard W. Manning and J. Knox Jones, Jr., MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 303, pp. 1-4 (1988)
8Tamias minimus, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 653, pp. 1–10 (2001)
9Tamias speciosus, Troy L. Best, Robin G. Clawson, and Joseph A. Clawson, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 478, pp. 1-9 (1994)
10Spermophilus columbianus, Charles L. Elliott and Jerran T. Flinders, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 372, pp. 1-9 (1991)
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
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