Animalia > Chordata > Amphibia > Anura > Bufonidae > Anaxyrus > Anaxyrus canorus
 

Anaxyrus canorus (Yosemite Toad)

Synonyms: Bufo canorus

Wikipedia Abstract

The Yosemite toad (Anaxyrus canorus, formerly Bufo canorus) is a species of true toad in the family Bufonidae. Endemic to the Sierra Nevada of California, the species ranges from the montane forests of El Dorado County near Lake Tahoe south to subalpine Fresno County near Tehipite Valley in Kings Canyon. Yosemite toads show a narrow elevational distribution from 6,200 feet to 11,300 feet.
View Wikipedia Record: Anaxyrus canorus

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Anaxyrus canorus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
47
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.55
EDGE Score: 3.79

Attributes

Female Maturity [2]  5 years
Male Maturity [2]  4 years
Diet [1]  Carnivore
Gestation [2]  11 days
Hibernates [1]  Yes
Litter Size [2]  1,750
Maximum Longevity [2]  15 years
Water Biome [1]  Rivers and Streams, Temporary Pools

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Sierra Nevada forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Ansel Adams Wilderness Area   California, United States  
John Muir Wilderness Area   California, United States      
Sequoia and Kings Canyon Biosphere Reserve II 172261 California, United States
Yosemite National Park II 95209 California, United States

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States Yes

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Cylindrotaenia americana <Unverified Name>[3]

Range Map

North America;

Audio

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Provided by Center for Biological Diversity via Myxer Author: Carlos Davidson / Cynthia Kagarise Sherman

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org 2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774 3Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Le Saout, S., Hoffmann, M., Shi, Y., Hughes, A., Bernard, C., Brooks, T.M., Bertzky, B., Butchart, S.H.M., Stuart, S.N., Badman, T. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2013) Protected areas and effective biodiversity conservation. Science, 342, 803–805 Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2