Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Rosales > Moraceae > Ficus > Ficus maxima
 

Ficus maxima

Synonyms: Ficus anthelminthica; Ficus bopiana; Ficus chaconiana; Ficus coybana; Ficus glaucescens; Ficus grandaeva; Ficus guadalajarana; Ficus hernandezii; Ficus kunthii; Ficus laurifolia; Ficus martinicensis; Ficus mexicana; Ficus murilloi; Ficus murilloi var. cajambrensis; Ficus neriifolia; Ficus parkeri; Ficus picardae; Ficus plumieri; Ficus protensa; Ficus pseudoradula; Ficus radula; Ficus rhododendrifolia; Ficus rubricosta; Ficus sodiroi; Ficus subscabrida; Ficus ulei; Ficus vicencionis; Galoglychia martinicensis; Pharmacosycea glaucescens; Pharmacosycea guyanensis; Pharmacosycea hernandezii; Pharmacosycea mexicana; Pharmacosycea pseudoradula; Pharmacosycea rigida; Urostigma kunthii; Urostigma laurifolium; Urostigma protensum

Wikipedia Abstract

Ficus maxima is a fig tree which is native to Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America south to Paraguay. Figs belong to the family Moraceae. The specific epithet maxima was coined by Scottish botanist Philip Miller in 1768; Miller's name was applied to this species in the Flora of Jamaica, but it was later determined that Miller's description was actually of the species now known as Ficus aurea.
View Wikipedia Record: Ficus maxima

Predators

Abgrallaspis cyanophylli (cyanophyllum scale)[1]
Alouatta pigra (Mexican black howler monkey)[2]
Artibeus jamaicensis (Jamaican fruit-eating bat)[2]
Cebus albifrons (white-fronted capuchin)[2]
Ceroplastes giganteus[1]
Dysmicoccus brevipes (pineapple mealybug)[1]
Howardia biclavis (mining scale)[1]
Lecanodiaspis africana[1]
Sapajus apella (brown capuchin)[2]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Tetrapus americanus[3]

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009 2"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572 3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
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