Plantae > Tracheophyta > Pinopsida > Pinales > Pinaceae > Pinus > Pinus albicaulis
 

Pinus albicaulis (Whitebark pine; Scrub pine)

Synonyms: Apinus albicaulis; Pinus cembroides; Pinus flexilis subsp. albicaulis; Pinus flexilis var. albicaulis; Pinus shasta
Language: Fre; Ger; Hrv, Srp; Hun; Ita

Wikipedia Abstract

Pinus albicaulis, whose many common names include whitebark pine, white pine, pitch pine, scrub pine, and creeping pine, occurs in the mountains of the western United States and Canada, specifically the subalpine areas of the Sierra Nevada, the Cascade Range, the Pacific Coast Ranges, and the Rocky Mountains from Wyoming northwards.
View Wikipedia Record: Pinus albicaulis

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Pinus albicaulis

Attributes

Height [3]  66 feet (20 m)
Width [1]  17 feet (5.3 m)
Air Quality Improvement [1]  Low
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Carbon Capture [1]  Low
Screening - Summer [2]  Moderate
Screening - Winter [2]  Moderate
Shade Percentage [1]  83 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Low
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 4 Low Temperature: -30 F° (-34.4 C°) → -20 F° (-28.9 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 8 Low Temperature: 10 F° (-12.2 C°) → 20 F° (-6.7 C°)
Light Preference [2]  Mixed Sun/Shade
Soil Acidity [2]  Neutral
Soil Fertility [2]  Infertile
Water Use [1]  Moderate to Low
Flower Color [2]  Yellow
Foliage Color [2]  Green
Fruit Color [2]  Brown
Bloom Period [2]  Mid Summer
Drought Tolerance [2]  High
Edible [3]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Fire Tolerance [2]  None
Flower Type [3]  Monoecious
Frost Free Days [2]  90 days
Fruit/Seed Abundance [2]  Low
Fruit/Seed Begin [2]  Summer
Fruit/Seed End [2]  Fall
Growth Form [2]  Single Stem
Growth Period [2]  Summer
Growth Rate [2]  Slow
Hazards [3]  The wood, sawdust and resins from various species of pine can cause dermatitis in sensitive people;
Leaf Type [3]  Evergreen
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Pollinators [3]  Wind
Propagation [2]  Bare Root, Container, Seed
Root Depth [2]  16 inches (41 cm)
Seed Spread Rate [2]  Slow
Seed Vigor [2]  Low
Seeds Per [2]  3600 / lb (7937 / kg)
Shape/Orientation [2]  Erect
Specific Gravity [4]  0.47
Structure [3]  Tree
Usage [3]  A tan or green dye is obtained from the needles; The needles contain a substance called terpene, this is released when rain washes over the needles and it has a negative effect on the germination of some plants, including wheat; Oleo-resins are present in the tissues of all species of pines, but these are often not present in sufficient quantity to make their extraction economically worthwhile; The resins are obtained by tapping the trunk, or by destructive distillation of the wood; In general, trees from warmer areas of distribution give the higher yields; Turpentine consists of an average of 20% of the oleo-resin; Turpentine has a wide range of uses including as a solvent for waxes etc, for making varnish, medicinal etc; Rosin is the substance left after turpentine is removed. This is used by violinists on their bows and also in making sealing wax, varnish etc; Pitch can also be obtained from the resin and is used for waterproofing, as a wood preservative etc. Wood - soft, light, coarse grained, brittle; Used occasionally for fuel;
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  None
View Plants For A Future Record : Pinus albicaulis

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Banff National Park II 1690912 Alberta, Canada
Carlton Ridge Research Natural Area Ia 949 Montana, United States  
Coram Biosphere Reserve 7460 Montana, United States
Crater Lake National Park II 180091 Oregon, United States
Glacier National Park II 953799 Montana, United States
Jasper National Park II 2776809 Alberta, Canada
Kootenay National Park II 341762 British Columbia, Canada
Mount Revelstoke National Park Ia 18 British Columbia, Canada
Olympic Biosphere Reserve II 922805 Washington, United States
Yellowstone Biosphere Reserve II 2196863 Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, United States
Yoho National Park II 317576 British Columbia, Canada

Ecosystems

Predators

Argyrotaenia tabulana[5]
Eucosma rescissoriana[5]
Nucifraga columbiana (Clark's Nutcracker)[6]
Puto cupressi (California nutmeg mealybug)[7]
Puto pricei (Price mealybug)[7]
Tamiasciurus hudsonicus (red squirrel)[8]
Ursus arctos (Grizzly Bear)[8]

Consumers

Mutual (symbiont) 
Cortinarius bigelowii[9]
Cortinarius harrisii[9]
Cortinarius magnivelatus[9]
Cortinarius rigens[9]
Gautieria graveolens[9]
Gautieria monticola[9]
Geopora cooperi[9]
Hydnotrya cubispora[9]
Hygrophorus chrysodon (Gold Flecked Woodwax)[9]
Hygrophorus gliocyclus[9]
Hygrophorus marzuolus (Arched Woodwax)[9]
Hygrophorus olivaceoalbus[9]
Hygrophorus subalpinus (subalpine waxycap)[9]
Hysterangium separabile[9]
Lactarius deterrimus (False Saffron Milkcap)[9]
Leucopaxillus paradoxus[9]
Suillus americanus (chicken fat mushroom)[9]
Tricholoma moseri[9]
Tricholoma saponaceum (soap-scented toadstool)[9]
Tylopilus sordidus (Cep)[9]
Parasitized by 
Arceuthobium campylopodum (western dwarf mistletoe)[6]

Range Map

W North America: Rocky Mountains, Cascade Range, Sierra Nevada TDWG: 71 ABT BRC 73 IDA MNT ORE WAS WYO 76 CAL NEV; W North America: Rocky Mountains, Cascade Range, Sierra Nevada. TDWG: 71 ABT BRC 73 IDA MNT ORE WAS WYO 76 CAL NEV;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database. 2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture 3Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License 4Forest Inventory and Analysis DB version 5.1, May 4, 2013, U.S. Forest Service 5HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández 6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics. 7Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009 8National Geographic Magazine - May 2016 - Yellowstone - The Carnivore Comeback 9ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI OF WHITEBARK PINE (PINUS ALBICAULIS) IN THE NORTHERN GREATER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM, Katherine Rose Mohatt, A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Plant Sciences, MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY Bozeman, Montana April 2006
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access