Plantae > Tracheophyta > Pinopsida > Pinales > Pinaceae > Pinus > Pinus armandii
 

Pinus armandii (Armand pine; Armand's pine; Chinese white pine; David's pine)

Language: Chi; Chinese; Fre; Ger; Hun; Ita; Rus

Wikipedia Abstract

Pinus armandii (family Pinaceae), the Chinese white pine, is a species of pine native to China, occurring from southern Shanxi west to southern Gansu and south to Yunnan, with outlying populations in Anhui and Taiwan; it also extends a short distance into northern Burma. In Chinese it is known as "Mount Hua pine" (华山松).It grows at 1,000-3,300 m altitude, with the lower altitudes mainly in the northern part of the range.
View Wikipedia Record: Pinus armandii

Infraspecies

Attributes

Height [2]  49 feet (15 m)
Width [2]  26 feet (8 m)
Air Quality Improvement [1]  Medium
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Carbon Capture [1]  Low
Shade Percentage [1]  83 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Wind Reduction [1]  High
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 6 Low Temperature: -10 F° (-23.3 C°) → 0 F° (-17.8 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 7 Low Temperature: 0 F° (-17.8 C°) → 10 F° (-12.2 C°)
Water Use [1]  Moderate to Low
Edible [2]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [2]  Monoecious
Hazards [2]  The wood, sawdust and resins from various species of pine can cause dermatitis in sensitive people;
Leaf Type [2]  Evergreen
Pollinators [2]  Wind
Specific Gravity [3]  0.37
Structure [2]  Tree
Usage [2]  A tan or green dye is obtained from the needles; The needles contain a substance called terpene, this is released when rain washes over the needles and it has a negative effect on the germination of some plants, including wheat; Oleo-resins are present in the tissues of all species of pines, but these are often not present in sufficient quantity to make their extraction economically worthwhile; The resins are obtained by tapping the trunk, or by destructive distillation of the wood; In general, trees from warmer areas of distribution give the higher yields; Turpentine consists of an average of 20% of the oleo-resin; Turpentine has a wide range of uses including as a solvent for waxes etc, for making varnish, medicinal etc; Rosin is the substance left after turpentine is removed. This is used by violinists on their bows and also in making sealing wax, varnish etc; Pitch can also be obtained from the resin and is used for waterproofing, as a wood preservative etc. Wood - soft. The timber is used for construction, railway sleepers, furniture, and wood fibre;
View Plants For A Future Record : Pinus armandii

Predators

Matsucoccus shennongjiaensis[4]
Parlatoria pini[4]
Parlatoria pinicola[4]
Rhinopithecus roxellana (Golden Snub-nosed Monkey)[5]

Distribution

China, Anhui, Chongqing, S Gansu, Guizhou, Guangxi, Hainan, Henan, Hubei, S Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan, extreme SE Xizang Zizhiqu (Tibet); N Myanmar (Burma); Taiwan TDWG: 36 CHC-CQ CHC-GZ CHC-HU CHC-SC CHC-YN CHH CHN-GS CHN-SA CHN-SX CHS-AH CHS-HE CHT 38 TAI 41 MYA; China, Anhui, Chongqing, S Gansu, Guizhou, Guangxi, Hainan, Henan, Hubei, S Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan, extreme SE Xizang [Tibet]; N Myanmar [Burma]; Taiwan. TDWG: 36 CHC-CQ CHC-GZ CHC-HU CHC-SC CHC-YN CHH CHN-GS CHN-SA CHN-SX CHS-AH CHS-HE CHT 38 TAI 41 MYA;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database. 2Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License 3Chave J, Coomes D, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Swenson NG, Zanne AE (2009) Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Ecology Letters 12: 351-366. Zanne AE, Lopez-Gonzalez G, Coomes DA, Ilic J, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Miller RB, Swenson NG, Wiemann MC, Chave J (2009) Data from: Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Dryad Digital Repository. 4Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009 5Seasonal Variation of Diet and Food Availability in a Group of Sichuan Snub-Nosed Monkeys in Shennongjia Nature Reserve, China; Li Yiming; American Journal of Primatology 68:217–233 (2006)
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access