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Pinus bungeana (Bunge's pine; Lace-bark pine)

Language: Chi; Chinese; Fre; Ger; Hun; Ita; Rus

Wikipedia Abstract

Pinus bungeana (English: Lacebark pine; Chinese: 白皮松 Japanese: シロマツ is a pine tree native to northeastern and central China. It is also known as white-barked pine. It is a slow-growing tree that can grow to heights of 15–25m and is frost hardy down to below -26°C. Its smooth, grey-green bark gradually sheds in round scales to reveal patches of pale yellow, which turn olive-brown, red and purple on exposure to light.
View Wikipedia Record: Pinus bungeana

Attributes

Height [2]  33 feet (10 m)
Width [2]  20 feet (6 m)
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Edible [2]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [2]  Monoecious
Hazards [2]  The wood, sawdust and resins from various species of pine can cause dermatitis in sensitive people;
Leaf Type [2]  Evergreen
Pollinators [2]  Wind
Specific Gravity [3]  0.418
Structure [2]  Tree
Usage [2]  A tan or green dye is obtained from the needles; The needles contain a substance called terpene, this is released when rain washes over the needles and it has a negative effect on the germination of some plants, including wheat; Oleo-resins are present in the tissues of all species of pines, but these are often not present in sufficient quantity to make their extraction economically worthwhile; The resins are obtained by tapping the trunk, or by destructive distillation of the wood; In general, trees from warmer areas of distribution give the higher yields; Turpentine consists of an average of 20% of the oleo-resin; Turpentine has a wide range of uses including as a solvent for waxes etc, for making varnish, medicinal etc; Rosin is the substance left after turpentine is removed. This is used by violinists on their bows and also in making sealing wax, varnish etc; Pitch can also be obtained from the resin and is used for waterproofing, as a wood preservative etc.
View Plants For A Future Record : Pinus bungeana

Distribution

China: S Gansu, S Hebei, W Henan, Hubei (Badong Xian), Shaanxi, W Shandong, Shanxi, N Sichuan The geographic range given above is based on the mapping of herbarium specimens, mostly in Beijing (PE)*, which we believe have been collected from trees growing in the wild. This map is roughly in agreement with that given by Ying & al. (2003). Other sources mention a wider distribution but seem to include planted specimens as well. This species is highly ornamental and has been planted in temple grounds etc. for many centuries. A conservative estimate of the EOO based on our data is 347,807 km² but calculating the AOO from this distribution probably overestimates it because the species is scattered. * courtesy Dr. Qiaoping Xiang, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing TDWG: 36 CHC-HU CHC-SC CHN-GS CHN-HB CHN-SA CHN-SD CHN-SX CHS-HE; China: S Gansu, S Hebei, W Henan, Hubei (Badong Xian), Shaanxi, W Shandong, Shanxi, N Sichuan . .The geographic range given above is based on the mapping of herbarium specimens, mostly in Beijing (PE)*, which we believe have been collected from trees growing in the wild. This map is roughly in agreement with that given by Ying et al. (2003). Other sources mention a wider distribution but seem to include planted specimens as well. This species is highly ornamental and has been planted in temple grounds etc. for many centuries. A conservative estimate of the EOO based on our data is 347,807 km² but calculating the AOO from this distribution probably overestimates it because the species is scattered. . .* courtesy Dr. Qiaoping Xiang, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. TDWG: 36 CHC-HU CHC-SC CHN-GS CHN-HB CHN-SA CHN-SD CHN-SX CHS-HE;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Derived from Allergy-Free Gardening OPALS™, Thomas Leo Ogren (2000) 2Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License 3Chave J, Coomes D, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Swenson NG, Zanne AE (2009) Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Ecology Letters 12: 351-366. Zanne AE, Lopez-Gonzalez G, Coomes DA, Ilic J, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Miller RB, Swenson NG, Wiemann MC, Chave J (2009) Data from: Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Dryad Digital Repository.
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
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