Plantae > Tracheophyta > Pinopsida > Pinales > Pinaceae > Pinus > Pinus lambertiana
 

Pinus lambertiana (Sugar pine)

Synonyms: Pinus lambertiana var. martirensis; Pinus lambertiana var. minor; Pinus lambertiana var. purpurea; Strobus lambertiana
Language: Chi; Dut; Fre; Ger; Hrv, Srp; Hun; Ita; Rus; Spa

Wikipedia Abstract

Pinus lambertiana (commonly known as the sugar pine or sugar cone pine) is the tallest and most massive pine tree, and has the longest cones of any conifer. The species name lambertiana was given by the British botanist David Douglas, who named the tree in honour of the English botanist, Aylmer Bourke Lambert. It is native to the mountains of the Pacific coast of North America, from Oregon through California to Baja California.
View Wikipedia Record: Pinus lambertiana

Attributes

Height [1]  44 feet (13.3 m)
Width [1]  31 feet (9.3 m)
Air Quality Improvement [1]  Low
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Carbon Capture [1]  Low
Screening - Summer [2]  Moderate
Screening - Winter [2]  Moderate
Shade Percentage [1]  83 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 5 Low Temperature: -20 F° (-28.9 C°) → -10 F° (-23.3 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 8 Low Temperature: 10 F° (-12.2 C°) → 20 F° (-6.7 C°)
Light Preference [2]  Mixed Sun/Shade
Soil Acidity [2]  Neutral
Soil Fertility [2]  Infertile
Water Use [1]  Moderate to Low
Flower Color [2]  Brown
Foliage Color [2]  Green
Fruit Color [2]  Brown
Fruit Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Bloom Period [2]  Spring
Drought Tolerance [2]  Medium
Fire Tolerance [2]  Low
Frost Free Days [2]  5 months
Fruit/Seed Abundance [2]  Medium
Fruit/Seed Begin [2]  Spring
Fruit/Seed End [2]  Summer
Growth Form [2]  Single Stem
Growth Period [2]  Spring, Summer, Fall
Growth Rate [2]  Rapid
Janka Hardness [4]  380 lbf (172 kgf) Very Soft
Leaf Type [3]  Evergreen
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Propagation [2]  Bare Root, Container, Cutting, Seed
Root Depth [2]  3.3 feet (102 cm)
Seed Spread Rate [2]  Slow
Seed Vigor [2]  Medium
Seeds Per [2]  2080 / lb (4586 / kg)
Shape/Orientation [2]  Erect
Specific Gravity [5]  0.36
Structure [3]  Tree
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  None

Predators

Aplodontia rufa californica[6]
Calliprason pallidus[7]
Dynaspidiotus californicus <Unverified Name>[8]
Matsucoccus paucicicatrices[8]
Pityococcus ferrisi[8]
Pseudocoremia suavis (Common Forest Looper)[7]
Tamias quadrimaculatus (long-eared chipmunk)[9]
Tamias speciosus (lodgepole chipmunk)[10]
Tamiasciurus mearnsi (Mearns's squirrel)[11]
Xylococculus macrocarpae[8]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Buprestis aurulenta (golden buprestid)[12]
Chrysophana placida[12]

Distribution

U.S.A.: California, Oregon, Nevada (extreme western part); NW Mexico: Baja California Norte (Sierra San Pedro Martír). TDWG: 73 ORE 76 CAL NEV 79 MXN-BC; USA: California, Oregon, Nevada (extreme western part); NW Mexico: Baja California Norte (Sierra San Pedro Martír).. TDWG: 73 ORE 76 CAL NEV 79 MXN-BC;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database. 2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture 3Kattge, J. et al. (2011b) TRY - a global database of plant traits Global Change Biology 17:2905-2935 4Wood Janka Hardness Scale/Chart J W Morlan's Unique Wood Gifts 5Forest Inventory and Analysis DB version 5.1, May 4, 2013, U.S. Forest Service 6An Ecological Survey of Endemic MOUNTAIN BEAVERS (Aplodontia rufa) in California, 1979-83, Dale T. Steele', State of California, THE RESOURCES AGENCY, Department of Fish and Game 7New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database 8Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009 9Tamias quadrimaculatus, Robin G. Clawson, Joseph A. Clawson, and Troy L. Best, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 469, pp. 1-6 (1994) 10Tamias speciosus, Troy L. Best, Robin G. Clawson, and Joseph A. Clawson, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 478, pp. 1-9 (1994) 11ECOLOGY OF THE ENDEMIC MEARNS’S SQUIRREL (TAMIASCIURUS MEARNSI) IN BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO, Nicolas Ramos-Lara, Dissertation, UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA (2012) 12Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access