Animalia > Arthropoda > Insecta > Diptera > Culicidae > Aedes > Aedes vexans
 

Aedes vexans (vexans mosquito)

Synonyms: Aedes euochrus; Aedes nocturmus; Culex articulatus; Culex malariae; Culex montcalmi; Culex niger; Culex parvus; Culex sudanensis; Culex sylvestris; Culicada eruthrosops; Culicada minuta; Culicada nipponii

Wikipedia Abstract

Aedes vexans is a cosmopolitan and common pest mosquito. It is a known vector of Dirofilaria immitis (dog heartworm); Myxomatosis (deadly rabbit virus disease); and tahyna-virus, a seldom-diagnosed Bunyaviridae, a disease which affects humans in Europe with fever which disappears after two days, but afterward can cause Encephalitis or Meningitis. Aedes vexans is the most common mosquito in Europe, often composing more than 80% the European mosquito community.
View Wikipedia Record: Aedes vexans

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Carlsbad Caverns National Park II 15448 New Mexico, United States

Prey / Diet

Equus caballus (horse)[1]
Homo sapiens (man)[1]
Sus scrofa (wild boar)[1]

Predators

Albibarbefferia albibarbis <Unverified Name>[2]
Leptogaster flavipes (Robber fly)[2]
Nerax aestuans <Unverified Name>[2]
Pogonioefferia pogonias <Unverified Name>[2]
Psorophora ciliata (Gallinipper)[1]
Tolmerus sadyates <Unverified Name>[2]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Dirofilaria immitis (Heartworm)[3]
Pollinator of 
Acer negundo (box elder)[1]
Symphoricarpos orbicularis <Unverified Name>[4]

Distribution

Alaska to N.S., s. to California and Florida, Eurasia, Africa,PacificI.;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
2Predator-Prey Database for the family Asilidae (Hexapoda: Diptera) Prepared by Dr. Robert Lavigne, Professor Emeritus, University of Wyoming, USA and Dr. Jason Londt (Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg)
3Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
4Robertson, C. Flowers and insects lists of visitors of four hundred and fifty three flowers. 1929. The Science Press Printing Company Lancaster, PA.
Protected Areas provided by Carlsbad Caverns National Park
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access