Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Cypriniformes > Cyprinidae > Devario > Devario malabaricus
 

Devario malabaricus (Malabar danio; Giant danio)

Synonyms: Danio malabaricus; Danio micronema; Eustira ceylonensis; Paradanio aurolineatus; Perilampus aurolineatus; Perilampus canarensis; Perilampus ceylonensis; Perilampus malabaricus; Perilampus mysoricus; Puntius malabaricus
Language: Assamese; Bengali; Czech; Danish; Finnish; German; Malayalam; Mandarin Chinese; Marathi; Oriya; Russian; Sinhalese; Swedish; Tamil

Wikipedia Abstract

The Malabar danio (Devario malabaricus formerly Danio malabaricus) is a tropical fish belonging to the minnow family (Cyprinidae). Originating in Sri Lanka and the west coast of India, the fish has been circulated throughout the world through the aquarium fish trade. It grows to a maximum length of 6.0 in (15.2 cm).The Malabar danio is found in tropical climates in a wide variety of waters, from mountain streams to small pools, but it prefers flowing waters.
View Wikipedia Record: Devario malabaricus

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve 1364022 India  

Prey / Diet

Boiga dendrophila (Gold-ringed Cat Snake, Mangrove Snake)[1]
Devario malabaricus (Malabar danio)[1]

Predators

Devario malabaricus (Malabar danio)[1]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Ancyrocephalus danionis <Unverified Name>[2]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Memphis Zoological Garden & Aquarium
North of England Zoological Society
Permskii Zoologicheskii Sad
Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium
The Deep
Toledo Zoological Gardens
Zoo de Fuengirola (Rain Forest SL)

Distribution

America, South - Inland waters; Asia - Inland waters; Asia: west coast of India and Sri Lanka. Has been widely transported around the world through the aquarium fish trade industry.; Colombia; India; Krishna River; Myanmar; Neotropical; Oriental; Sri Lanka;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics. 2Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access