Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Scorpaeniformes > Cottidae > Scorpaenichthys > Scorpaenichthys marmoratus
 

Scorpaenichthys marmoratus (Sculpin; Sea raven; Muddler; Marbled sculpin; Giant marbled sculpin; Cabezone; Cabezon; Bullhead)

Synonyms: Hemitripteras marmoratus; Hemitripterus marmoratus
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Wikipedia Abstract

The Cabezon, Scorpaenichthys marmoratus, is a sculpin native to the Pacific coast of North America. Although the genus name translates literally as "scorpion fish," true scorpionfish, i.e., the lionfish and stonefish, belong to the related family Scorpaenidae. This species is the only known member of its genus.
View Wikipedia Record: Scorpaenichthys marmoratus

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary   California, United States
Channel Islands National Park II 139010 California, United States
Farallon National Wildlife Refuge IV 352 California, United States
Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve II 366714 British Columbia, Canada
Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Reserve 293047 British Columbia, Canada  
Pacific Rim National Park Reserve II 137900 British Columbia, Canada

Prey / Diet

Citharichthys stigmaeus (Speckled sanddab)[1]
Engraulis mordax (Californian anchoveta)[1]
Gibbonsia montereyensis (scarlet kelpfish)[1]
Glebocarcinus oregonensis (pygmy rock crab)[2]
Haliotis corrugata (pink abalone)[1]
Haliotis cracherodii (black abalone)[1]
Haliotis kamtschatkana (pinto abalone)[1]
Haliotis rufescens (red abalone)[1]
Heptacarpus stimpsoni (Stimpson coastal shrimp)[2]
Leiocottus hirundo (Lavender sculpin)[1]
Loxorhynchus crispatus (moss crab)[3]
Loxorhynchus grandis (sheep crab)[1]
Lythrypnus dalli (Catalina goby)[1]
Metacarcinus magister (Dungeness crab)[2]
Neoclinus blanchardi (Sarcastic fringehead)[1]
Panulirus interruptus (California spiny lobster)[1]
Pugettia foliatus (foliate kelp crab)[3]
Pugettia producta (northern kelp crab)[1]
Rhinogobiops nicholsii (Blackeye goby)[1]
Sebastes atrovirens (Rockfish)[1]
Sebastes auriculatus (Bolina)[1]
Sebastes carnatus (Rockfish)[1]
Sebastes caurinus (Copper rockfish)[1]
Sebastes chrysomelas (Rockfish)[1]
Sebastes paucispinis (Bocaccio)[1]
Sebastes serranoides (Rockfish)[1]
Sebastes serriceps (Treefish)[1]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Beringraja binoculata (Big skate)1
Blepsias cirrhosus (Silverspotted sculpin)1
Clangula hyemalis (Oldsquaw)1
Embiotoca jacksoni (Black perch)1
Hemilepidotus hemilepidotus (Red Irish lord)3
Hexagrammos decagrammus (Kelp greenling)4
Hexagrammos stelleri (Greenling)2
Hippoglossus stenolepis (Pacific halibut)1
Hydrolagus colliei (Spotted rattfish)3
Leptocottus armatus (Cabezon)1
Rhacochilus vacca (Pile surfperch)2
Sebastes caurinus (Copper rockfish)1
Sebastes chrysomelas (Rockfish)1

Predators

Anoplopoma fimbria (Skil)[4]
Cerorhinca monocerata (Rhinoceros Auklet)[1]
Clupea pallasii (Pacific herring)[1]
Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle)[1]
Homo sapiens (man)[1]
Morone saxatilis (Striper bass)[1]
Oncorhynchus clarkii (Cutthroat trout)[4]
Oncorhynchus kisutch (coho salmon or silver salmon)[4]
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (chinook salmon or king salmon)[4]
Ophiodon elongatus (Lingcod)[4]
Paralichthys californicus (Halibut)[1]
Phalacrocorax penicillatus (Brandt's Cormorant)[1]
Phoca vitulina (Harbor Seal)[4]
Prionace glauca (Tribon blou)[4]
Ptychoramphus aleuticus (Cassin's Auklet)[4]
Sternula antillarum (Least Tern)[4]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Genitocotyle acirrus[5]
Genolinea anura[5]
Helicometrina nimia[5]
Prosorhynchus scalpellus[5]
Tubulovesicula lindbergi[5]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Aquarium du Quebec
John Ball Zoological Garden
John G. Shedd Aquarium
Milwaukee County Zoological Gardens
Rotterdam Zoo
Steinhart Aquarium (CA Acad of Science
Toledo Zoological Gardens

Distribution

Alaska (USA); California Current; Canada; Eastern Pacific: Sitka, southeastern Alaska to Punta Abrejos, central Baja California, Mexico.; Gulf of Alaska; Mexico; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northeast; USA (contiguous states);

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
2Food Web Relationships of Northern Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca : a Synthesis of the Available Knowledge, Charles A. Simenstad, Bruce S. Miller, Carl F. Nyblade, Kathleen Thornburgh, and Lewis J. Bledsoe, EPA-600 7-29-259 September 1979
3COEXISTENCE IN A KELP FOREST: SIZE, POPULATION DYNAMICS, AND RESOURCE PARTITIONING IN A GUILD OF SPIDER CRABS (BRACHYURA, MAJIDAE), ANSON H. HINES, Ecological Monographs, 52(2), 1982, pp. 179-198
4Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository.
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access