Animalia > Chordata > Elasmobranchii > Carcharhiniformes > Carcharhinidae > Carcharhinus > Carcharhinus leucas
 

Carcharhinus leucas (Zambezi shark; Swan river whaler shark; Swan River whaler; Shark; River whaler shark; River whaler; Requin bouledogue; Hervey Bay whaler shark; Ground shark; Freshwater whaler; Estuary whaler shark; Estuary shark; Cub shark; Bullshark; Bull shark)

Synonyms: Carcharhinus amboinensis; Carcharhinus azureus; Carcharhinus nicaraguensis; Carcharhinus vanrooyeni; Carcharhinus zambezensis; Carcharias azureus; Carcharias leucas; Carcharias spenceri; Carcharias zambesensis; Carcharias zambezensis; Carcharicus leucas; Carcharinus leucas; Carcharinus zambesensis; Eulamia nicaraguensis; Galeolamna bogimba; Galeolamna greyi mckaili; Galeolamna lamia; Galeolamna leucas; Galeolamna mckaili; Prionodon platyodon; Squalus obtusus; Squalus platyodon
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Wikipedia Abstract

The bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas), also known as the Zambezi shark or, unofficially, as Zambi in Africa and Nicaragua shark in Nicaragua, is a requiem shark commonly found worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. The bull shark is known for its aggressive nature, predilection for warm shallow water, and presence in brackish and freshwater systems including estuaries and rivers.Bull sharks can thrive in both saltwater and freshwater and can travel far up rivers.
View Wikipedia Record: Carcharhinus leucas

Attributes

Adult Weight [2]  383.77 lbs (174.08 kg)
Female Maturity [2]  18 years
Male Maturity [2]  17 years 3 months
Litter Size [2]  10
Maximum Longevity [2]  32 years
Migration [1]  Amphidromous
Water Biome [1]  Reef, Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams, Coastal

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Aldabra Special Reserve 86487 Seychelles    
Canaveral National Seashore II 9090 Florida, United States
Central Gulf Coastal Plain Biosphere Reserve 40530 United States  
Corcovado National Park 115845 Costa Rica  
Dzilam de Bravo Wetland Reserve 149170 Yucatan, Mexico    
Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary IV 2387149 Florida, United States
Kruger National Park II 4718115 Mpumalanga, South Africa
Kruger to Canyons Biosphere Reserve   Mpumalanga, South Africa  
Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve State Sustainable Development Reserve VI 3260792 Amazonas, Brazil  
Maya Multiple Use Area 1156412 Guatemala  
Prince Regent River Nature Reserve Ia 1428602 Western Australia, Australia  
Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve   Honduras      
Reserva de la Biosfera de Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve VI 1312618 Mexico  

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Acanthopagrus butcheri (Southern yellowfin bream)[3]
Acanthostracion quadricornis (Trunkfish)[4]
Aldrichetta forsteri (Yellow-eye mullet)[3]
Amniataba caudavittata (Yellowtailed perch)[3]
Archosargus probatocephalus (Southern sheeps head)[4]
Ariopsis felis (Sea catfish)[4]
Bagre marinus (Slooprig)[4]
Bodianus diplotaenia (Pacific hogfish)[5]
Brevoortia patronus (Bunker)[4]
Carcharhinus leucas (Zambezi shark)[4]
Carcharhinus signatus (Shark)[4]
Centropomus undecimalis (Thin snook)[4]
Cephalopholis panamensis (Panama graysby)[5]
Dasyatis sabina (Atlantic stingray)[4]
Dasyatis say (Say's stingray)[4]
Elops saurus (Ladyfish)[4]
Epinephelus labriformis (lateralband grouper)[5]
Euthynnus alletteratus (Little tunny)[4]
Farfantepenaeus duorarum (pink shrimp)[4]
Gymnothorax castaneus (Panamic green moray)[5]
Gymnothorax dovii (Speckled moray)[5]
Hyporhamphus regularis (river garfish)[3]
Lagodon rhomboides (Salt-water bream)[4]
Litopenaeus setiferus (white shrimp)[4]
Lophogobius cyprinoides (Crested goby)[4]
Lutjanus argentiventris (yellowtail snapper)[5]
Lutjanus novemfasciatus (black snapper)[5]
Lutjanus viridis (Blue-and-gold snapper)[5]
Megalops atlanticus (Tarpon)[4]
Mugil cephalus (gray mullet)[4]
Novaculichthys taeniourus (clown wrasse)[5]
Opsanus tau (Oyster toadfish)[4]
Rhabdosargus sarba (Yellowfin bream)[3]
Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Atlantic sharp-nosed shark)[4]
Scomberomorus regalis (painted mackerel)[4]
Squatina dumeril (Atlantic angelshark)[4]
Synodus foetens (Soapfish)[4]
Thalassoma grammaticum (Sunset wrasse)[5]
Trinectes maculatus (Hogchoker)[4]
Zalophus californianus (California Sealion)[4]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Acanthocybium solandri (Wahoo fish)10

Predators

Carcharhinus leucas (Zambezi shark)[4]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Callitetrarhynchus gracilis[6]
Dasyrhynchus giganteus[6]
Dasyrhynchus variouncinatus <Unverified Name>[6]
Dermophthirius maccallumi[6]
Granulinema carcharhini <Unverified Name>[6]
Granulinema simile <Unverified Name>[6]
Grillotia perelica <Unverified Name>[6]
Heteronybelinia estigmena[6]
Nybelinia africana[6]
Nybelinia lingualis[6]
Otobothrium cysticum[6]
Otobothrium insigne[6]
Otobothrium penetrans[6]
Platybothrium angelbahiense[6]
Platybothrium cervinum[6]
Poecilancistrium caryophyllum[6]
Poecilancistrum robustum <Unverified Name>[6]

Distribution

Aldabra Special Reserve; Widespread in warm oceans, rivers and lakes. Western Atlantic: Massachusetts, USA to Argentina (Ref 58839). Eastern Atlantic: Morocco, Senegal to Angola. Indo-Pacific: Kenya and South Africa to India, then, Viet Nam to Australia; southern Baja California, Mexico to Ecuador and possibly occurring in Peru. Sympatric with <i>Carcharhinus amboinensis</i>, <i>Glyphis gangeticus</i>.; Widespread in warm oceans, rivers and lakes. Western Atlantic: Massachusetts, USA to Argentina (Ref. 58839). Eastern Atlantic: Morocco, Senegal to Angola (Ref. 81283). Indo-Pacific: Kenya and South Africa to India, then, Viet Nam to Australia; southern Baja California, Mexico to Ecuador and possibly occurring in Peru. Sympatric with <i>Carcharhinus amboinensis</i>, <i>Glyphis gangeticus</i>.;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org 2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774 3Fish diets and food webs in the Swan–Canning estuary, River Science July 2009, Department of Water, Government of Western Australia 4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics. 5Food-Web Structure and Dynamics of Eastern Tropical Pacific Coral Reefs: Panamá and Galápagos Islands, Peter W. Glynn, Food Webs and the Dynamics of Marine Reefs, eds. Tim R. McClanahan & George M. Branch, p. 185-208 (2008) 6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access