Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Cypriniformes > Cyprinidae > Notropis > Notropis procne
 

Notropis procne (Swallowtail shiner)

Synonyms: Hybognathus procne
Language: Chinese; Czech; Mandarin Chinese

Wikipedia Abstract

The swallowtail shiner (Notropis procne) is a North American species of freshwater fish in the Cyprinidae family. It has a slender and long body of about 40–55 mm. The shiner has a pale yellow back with a blue stripe on its silver side. It also has a silvery white belly. Its fins are yellowish and it has a dorsal fin originating above the back half of the pelvic fin base and a tail fin with a black spot at its base. Its snout is either slightly pointed or slightly rounded.
View Wikipedia Record: Notropis procne

Attributes

Female Maturity [1]  2 years
Diet [2]  Planktivore, Carnivore (Invertebrates)
Adult Length [1]  2.8 inches (7 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Lithophils (gravel-sand)
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  2,500
Maximum Longevity [1]  3 years

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Appalachian Piedmont United States Nearctic Temperate Coastal Rivers    

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park VI 715 West Virginia, United States
Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site III 861 Pennsylvania, United States
New Jersey Pinelands Biosphere Reserve   New Jersey, United States  
Rock Creek Park   District of Columbia, United States

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
National Aquarium in Baltimore Inc

Range Map

America, North - Inland waters; Nearctic; North America: Atlantic drainages from Delaware and Susquehanna rivers in New York, USA to Santee River in South Carolina, USA; Lake Ontario drainage in New York.; USA (contiguous states);

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access