Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Nototheniidae > Paranotothenia > Paranotothenia magellanica
 

Paranotothenia magellanica (Orange throat notothen; Maori cod; Maori chief; Magellanic rockcod; Blue notothenia; Black cod)

Synonyms: Gadus magellanicus; Notothenia macrocephalus; Notothenia magellanica; Notothenia maoriensis
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Wikipedia Abstract

The Maori cod (Paranotothenia magellanica), also known as Magellanic rockcod, blue notothenia or orange throat notothen, is a species of cod icefish native to the Southern Ocean. "Maori chief" and "black cod", sometimes used for this species, usually refer to fishes from the related genus Notothenia. It occurs at depths of from near the surface to 255 metres (837 ft), though it is usually found at less than 20 metres (66 ft) This species can reach a length of 38 centimetres (15 in) SL.
View Wikipedia Record: Paranotothenia magellanica

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Macquarie Island Nature Reserve Ia 233540 Tasmania, Australia  

Prey / Diet

Anasterias rupicola[1]
Exosphaeroma gigas[1]
Gaimardia trapesina[1]
Halicarcinus planatus[1]
Harpagifer georgianus (S. Georgia spiny plunderfish)[1]
Hemiarthrum setulosum[1]
Jassa falcata (Mottled tube-making amphipod)[1]
Kidderia minuta[1]
Laevilitorina caliginosa[1]
Lasaea consanguinea[1]
Notothenia cyanobrancha (Blue rockcod)[1]
Paranotothenia magellanica (Orange throat notothen)[1]
Platynereis australis[1]
Santia bicornis[1]
Siphonaria lateralis[1]

Predators

Anasterias rupicola[1]
Aptenodytes patagonicus (King Penguin)[1]
Arctocephalus gazella (Antarctic Fur Seal)[1]
Arctocephalus tropicalis (Subantarctic Fur Seal)[1]
Crossaster papposus (spiny sun star, common sun star)[1]
Eudyptes chrysocome (Rockhopper Penguin)[1]
Eudyptes schlegeli (Royal Penguin)[1]
Harpagifer georgianus (S. Georgia spiny plunderfish)[1]
Larus dominicanus (Kelp Gull)[1]
Leucocarbo atriceps (imperial shag)[2]
Notothenia coriiceps (Black rockcod)[1]
Paranotothenia magellanica (Orange throat notothen)[1]
Phocarctos hookeri (New Zealand Sealion)[1]
Procellaria aequinoctialis (White-chinned Petrel)[1]
Pygoscelis papua (Gentoo Penguin)[3]
Thalassarche chrysostoma (Grey-headed Albatross)[1]
Thalassarche melanophris (Black-browed Albatross)[4]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Aspersentis megarhynchus[5]
Corynosoma hamanni[5]
Lecithaster macrocotyle[5]
Lepidapedon garrardi[5]
Neolepidapedon macquariensis[5]
Neolepidapedon magnatestis[5]

Distribution

Antarctic; Argentina; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Antarctic; Atlantic, Southwest; Chile; Falkland Is. (Malvinas); French Southern Tr.; Heard and McDonald Is.; Humboldt Current; Indian Ocean; Indian Ocean, Antarctic; Kerguelen Islands; Macquarie Island; New Zealand; New Zealand Shelf; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Antarctic; Pacific, Southeast; Pacific, Southwest; Patagonian Shelf; S. Georgia - S. Sandwich Is.; South Orkney Islands; Southern Ocean: southern tip of South America. Also found in Falkland, South Georgia, South Orkney, South Shetland, Prince Edward, Crozet, Kerguelen, Heard and Macquarie islands, southern New Zealand and associated islands, rarely in the Ross Sea. New ; Southern Ocean: southern tip of South America. Also found in Falkland, South Georgia, South Orkney, South Shetland, Prince Edward, Crozet, Kerguelen, Heard and Macquarie islands, southern New Zealand and associated islands, rarely in the Ross Sea. New Zealand and Argentina (Patagonia) (Ref. 4537); Southwest Chilean Waters;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics. 2THE DIETS AND DIETARY SEGREGATION OF SEABIRDS AT THE SUBANTARCTIC CROZET ISLANDS, VINCENT RIDOUX, MARINE ORNITHOLOGY Vol. 22 No. 1 1994 3Spatial and temporal variation in the diet of the gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) at Kerguelen Islands, Amélie Lescroël, Vincent Ridoux and Charles André Bost, Polar Biol (2004) 27: 206–216 4Food and feeding ecology of the neritic-slope forager black-browed albatross and its relationships with commercial fisheries in Kerguelen waters, Yves Cherel, Henri Weimerskirch, Colette Trouve, MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES, Vol. 207: 183–199, 2000 5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access