Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Nototheniidae > Dissostichus > Dissostichus eleginoides
 

Dissostichus eleginoides (Patagonsky klykach; Patagonian toothfish; Patagonian tootfish)

Synonyms: Dissostichus amissus; Dissosticus eleginoides; Macrias amissus
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Wikipedia Abstract

Dissostichus eleginoides, the Patagonian toothfish, is a species of cod icefish found in cold waters (1–4 °C or 34–39 °F) between depths of 45 m (148 ft) and 3,850 m (12,631 ft) in the southern Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans and Southern Ocean on seamounts and continental shelves around most sub-Antarctic islands.A close relative, the Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni), is found farther south around the edges of the Antarctic shelf; and a Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fishery is active in the Ross Sea.The average weight of a commercially caught Patagonian toothfish is 7–10 kg (15–22 lb), depending on the fishery, with large adults occasionally exceeding 100 kilograms (220 lb).
View Wikipedia Record: Dissostichus eleginoides

Attributes

Migration [1]  Oceanodromous

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Macquarie Island Nature Reserve Ia 233540 Tasmania, Australia  

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Adelieledone polymorpha[2]
Alluroteuthis antarctica[3]
Antimora rostrata (flatnose codling)[2]
Brachioteuthis linkovskyi[2]
Chaenocephalus aceratus (Scotian icefish)[2]
Chaenodraco wilsoni (Spiny icefish)[2]
Champsocephalus gunnari (Mackerel icefish)[2]
Chiroteuthis veranii (Long-armed Squid)[2]
Electrona antarctica (Lanternfish)[2]
Electrona carlsbergi (Electron subantarctic)[4]
Euphausia superba (Antarctic krill)[5]
Euphausia triacantha[2]
Filippovia knipovitchi (Smooth Hooked Squid)[3]
Gobionotothen gibberifrons (Humped rockcod)[2]
Gobionotothen marionensis (Lobe-lip notothen)[2]
Gymnoscopelus bolini (Lanternfish)[2]
Gymnoscopelus braueri (Lanternfish)[2]
Gymnoscopelus fraseri (Lanternfish)[2]
Gymnoscopelus hintonoides (False-midas lanternfish)[2]
Gymnoscopelus nicholsi (Nichol's lanternfish)[2]
Gymnoscopelus piabilis (Southern blacktip lanternfish)[2]
Histioteuthis atlantica[2]
Histioteuthis eltaninae[2]
Histioteuthis macrohista[2]
Illex argentinus (Argentine Shortfin Squid)[2]
Kondakovia longimana (Giant Warty Squid)[3]
Krefftichthys anderssoni (Anderson's lanternfish)[2]
Lepidonotothen squamifrons (Grey rockcod)[2]
Lindbergichthys nudifrons (Yellowfin notie)[2]
Martialia hyadesi (sevenstar flying squid)[2]
Metelectrona ventralis (Flaccid lanternfish)[2]
Micromesistius australis (Southern poutassou)[2]
Muraenolepis microps (Smalleye moray cod)[2]
Ningaui yvonnae (Southern Ningaui)[2]
Nototheniops larseni (Painted notie)[2]
Onykia ingens (warty squid)[5]
Onykia robsoni (Rugose Hooked Squid)[2]
Paradiplospinus gracilis (Slender escolar)[2]
Pareledone turqueti (Turquet's Octopus)[3]
Patagonotothen guntheri (Yellowfin notothen)[2]
Pholidoteuthis massyae[2]
Protomyctophum bolini (Lanternfish)[2]
Protomyctophum choriodon (Lanternfish)[2]
Protomyctophum parallelum (Parallel lanternfish)[2]
Pseudochaenichthys georgianus (South Georgia icefish)[2]
Slosarczykovia circumantarctica[2]
Stauroteuthis gilchristi[2]
Stomias boa boa (Boa dragonfish)[4]
Taningia danae (Dana Octopus Squid)[2]
Taonius pavo[3]
Themisto gaudichaudii[2]
Todarodes filippovae (Antarctic flying squid)[2]
Trematomus hansoni (Striped rockcod)[2]
Vibilia antarctica[2]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Allothunnus fallai (Tuna)1
Aptenodytes patagonicus (King Penguin)4
Arctocephalus gazella (Antarctic Fur Seal)4
Arctocephalus tropicalis (Subantarctic Fur Seal)2
Balaenoptera bonaerensis (Antarctic Minke Whale)1
Bathydraco marri (Deepwater dragon)1
Chaenocephalus aceratus (Scotian icefish)1
Champsocephalus esox (Pike icefish)1
Champsocephalus gunnari (Mackerel icefish)1
Cygnodraco mawsoni (Mawson's dragonfish)1
Daption capense (Cape Petrel)1
Diomedea exulans (Wandering Albatross)5
Dissostichus mawsoni (Antarctic blenny)1
Electrona carlsbergi (Electron subantarctic)1
Eudyptes chrysolophus (Macaroni Penguin)2
Eudyptes schlegeli (Royal Penguin)1
Fulmarus glacialoides (Southern Fulmar)4
Galeus melastomus (Black-mouth catshark)1
Globicephala melas (Long-finned Pilot Whale)2
Gobionotothen angustifrons (Narrowhead rockcod)1
Gobionotothen gibberifrons (Humped rockcod)1
Gymnodraco acuticeps (Ploughfish)1
Gymnoscopelus braueri (Lanternfish)1
Gymnoscopelus nicholsi (Nichol's lanternfish)1
Gymnoscopelus opisthopterus (Lanternfish)1
Halobaena caerulea (Blue Petrel)1
Hydrurga leptonyx (Leopard seal)2
Hyperoodon planifrons (Southern Bottlenose Whale)5
Lagenorhynchus cruciger (Hourglass Dolphin)2
Lampris immaculatus (Moonfish)1
Larus dominicanus (Kelp Gull)1
Lepidonotothen squamifrons (Grey rockcod)2
Leptonychotes weddellii (Weddell Seal)4
Lindbergichthys nudifrons (Yellowfin notie)1
Lobodon carcinophaga (Crabeater Seal)2
Macronectes giganteus (Southern Giant Petrel)2
Megaptera novaeangliae (Humpback Whale)2
Mirounga leonina (Southern Elephant Seal)4
Nototheniops larseni (Painted notie)1
Oceanites oceanicus (Wilson's Storm-Petrel)1
Ommatophoca rossii (Ross Seal)2
Pachyptila belcheri (Slender-billed Prion)1
Pachyptila desolata (Antarctic Prion)1
Pachyptila turtur (Fairy Prion)1
Parachaenichthys georgianus (Antarctic dragonfish)1
Phoebetria fusca (Sooty Albatross)2
Phoebetria palpebrata (Light-mantled Albatross)3
Physeter macrocephalus (Sperm Whale)4
Pseudochaenichthys georgianus (South Georgia icefish)1
Pygoscelis adeliae (Adelie Penguin)2
Pygoscelis antarcticus (Chinstrap Penguin)2
Pygoscelis papua (Gentoo Penguin)2
Sterna vittata (Antarctic Tern)1
Thalassarche chrysostoma (Grey-headed Albatross)3
Thalassarche melanophris (Black-browed Albatross)3
Thalassoica antarctica (Antarctic Petrel)3
Trematomus hansoni (Striped rockcod)1
Vomeridens infuscipinnis (Antarctic dragonfish)1
Ziphius cavirostris (Cuvier's Beaked Whale)2

Predators

Aptenodytes forsteri (Emperor Penguin)[5]
Aptenodytes patagonicus (King Penguin)[2]
Arctocephalus gazella (Antarctic Fur Seal)[2]
Chaenocephalus aceratus (Scotian icefish)[2]
Cottoperca gobio (Channel bull blenny)[2]
Diomedea exulans (Wandering Albatross)[2]
Diplophos rebainsi (Rebains' portholefish)[2]
Hyperoodon planifrons (Southern Bottlenose Whale)[2]
Lobodon carcinophaga (Crabeater Seal)[5]
Megaptera novaeangliae (Humpback Whale)[5]
Mirounga leonina (Southern Elephant Seal)[2]
Onykia ingens (warty squid)[2]
Phocarctos hookeri (New Zealand Sealion)[2]
Pygoscelis adeliae (Adelie Penguin)[5]
Pygoscelis papua (Gentoo Penguin)[6]
Salilota australis (Tadpole codling)[2]
Somniosus antarcticus (southern sleeper shark)[2]
Thalassarche chrysostoma (Grey-headed Albatross)[2]
Thalassarche melanophris (Black-browed Albatross)[7]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Anisakis physeteris <Unverified Name>[8]
Anisakis simplex[8]
Ascarophis nototheniae <Unverified Name>[8]
Aspersentis dissosthychi[8]
Brachyphallus crenatus[8]
Clestobothrium crassiceps[8]
Contracaecum osculatum[8]
Corynosoma bullosum[8]
Corynosoma hamanni[8]
Corynosoma pseudohamanni[8]
Cucullanellus fraseri <Unverified Name>[8]
Derogenes varicus[8]
Dichelyne fraseri <Unverified Name>[8]
Echinorhynchus longiproboscis[8]
Echinorhynchus petrotschenkoi[8]
Elytrophalloides oatesi[8]
Glomericirrus macrouri[8]
Glomericirrus ulmeri[2]
Gonocerca crassa[8]
Gonocerca phycidis[8]
Gonocerca taeniata <Unverified Name>[8]
Grillotia erinaceus[8]
Hepatoxylon trichiuri[8]
Hysterothylacium nototheniae <Unverified Name>[8]
Lacistorhynchus tenuis[8]
Lecithaster australis <Unverified Name>[8]
Lecithaster macrocotyle[8]
Lecithochirium genypteri[8]
Lepidapedon garrardi[8]
Lepidapedon taeniatum <Unverified Name>[8]
Macvicaria georgiana[8]
Macvicaria pennelli[8]
Metacanthocephalus dalmori[8]
Metacanthocephalus rennicki[8]
Neolebouria antarctica[8]
Neolepidapedon magnatestis[8]
Neolepidapedon trematomi[8]
Neopavlovskioides dissostichi <Unverified Name>[8]
Neopavlovskioides georgianus <Unverified Name>[8]
Onchobothrium antarcticum[8]
Pseudobenedenia dissostichi <Unverified Name>[8]
Pseudobenedenia nototheniae[8]
Pseudobenedeniella branchiale <Unverified Name>[8]
Pseudoterranova decipiens[8]
Scolex pleuronectis <Unverified Name>[8]

Distribution

Antarctic; Argentina; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Antarctic; Atlantic, Southwest; Chile; Falkland Is. (Malvinas); French Southern Tr.; Humboldt Current; Indian Ocean; Indian Ocean, Antarctic; Kerguelen Islands; Macquarie Island; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Antarctic; Pacific, Southeast; Pacific, Southwest; Patagonian Shelf; S. Georgia - S. Sandwich Is.; South Scotia Sea; Southeast Pacific and Southwest Atlantic: southern Chile round the coast to Patagonia (Argentina) and the Falkland Islands. Southwest Pacific: Macquarie Island. Southern Ocean: South Georgia. Also known from sub-Antarctic islands and seamounts of th; Southeast Pacific and Southwest Atlantic: southern Chile round the coast to Patagonia (Argentina) and the Falkland Islands. Southwest Pacific: Macquarie Island. Southern Ocean: South Georgia. Also known from sub-Antarctic islands and seamounts of the Indian sector.; Southwest Chilean Waters;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM 2Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics. 3CephBase - Cephalopod (Octopus, Squid, Cuttlefish and Nautilus) Database 4Pakhomov, E.A. and Bushula, T. and Kaehler, S. and Watkins, B.P. and Leslie, R.W. (2006) Structure and distribution of the slope fish community in the vicinity of the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Archipelago. Journal of Fish Biology, 68 (6). pp. 1834-1866 5Who's Eating Who 6Spatial and temporal variation in the diet of the gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) at Kerguelen Islands, Amélie Lescroël, Vincent Ridoux and Charles André Bost, Polar Biol (2004) 27: 206–216 7Food and feeding ecology of the neritic-slope forager black-browed albatross and its relationships with commercial fisheries in Kerguelen waters, Yves Cherel, Henri Weimerskirch, Colette Trouve, MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES, Vol. 207: 183–199, 2000 8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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