Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Gasterosteiformes > Aulorhynchidae > Aulorhynchus > Aulorhynchus flavidus
 

Aulorhynchus flavidus (Tube-snout)

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Wikipedia Abstract

Aulorhynchus flavidus, the tube-snout, is a species of fish related to the sticklebacks. It is the only species in the genus Aulorhynchus which is the only genus currently recognized in the family Aulorhynchidae.This species grows to 18 cm (7.1 in) in total length. It physically resembles the sticklebacks, but has a thinner, longer body, with 24 to 27 small spines in front of the dorsal fin. It also possess a slender snout, hence the common name.
View Wikipedia Record: Aulorhynchus flavidus

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary   California, United States
Channel Islands National Park II 139010 California, United States
Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve II 366714 British Columbia, Canada
Pacific Rim National Park Reserve II 137900 British Columbia, Canada

Prey / Diet

Aulorhynchus flavidus (Tube-snout)[1]

Predators

Aulorhynchus flavidus (Tube-snout)[1]
Cerorhinca monocerata (Rhinoceros Auklet)[1]
Leptocottus armatus (Cabezon)[2]
Ophiodon elongatus (Lingcod)[1]
Paralabrax clathratus (Sea bass)[1]
Paralichthys californicus (Halibut)[1]
Scorpaena guttata (finscaled scoprionfish)[1]
Sebastes auriculatus (Bolina)[1]
Sebastes carnatus (Rockfish)[1]
Sebastes chrysomelas (Rockfish)[1]
Uria aalge (Common Murre)[1]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Microcotyle sebastis[1]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo
Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Ctr

Distribution

Alaska (USA); California Current; Canada; Eastern Pacific: Sitka, Alaska to Punta Banda, northern Baja California, Mexico.; Gulf of Alaska; Mexico; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northeast; USA (contiguous states);

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics. 2Food Web Relationships of Northern Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca : a Synthesis of the Available Knowledge, Charles A. Simenstad, Bruce S. Miller, Carl F. Nyblade, Kathleen Thornburgh, and Lewis J. Bledsoe, EPA-600 7-29-259 September 1979
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access