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Eucalyptus leucoxylon (white ironbark)

Wikipedia Abstract

Eucalyptus leucoxylon, commonly known as yellow gum, blue gum or white ironbark, is a species eucalypt that is endemic to Australia. It is widely distributed on plains and nearby mountain ranges or coastal South Australia, where it is known as the Blue Gum and extends into the western half of Victoria where it is known as the yellow gum.
View Wikipedia Record: Eucalyptus leucoxylon

Infraspecies

Attributes

Height [3]  49 feet (15 m)
Width [1]  37 feet (11.4 m)
Air Quality Improvement [1]  None
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-High
Carbon Capture [1]  Medium-Low
Screening - Summer [2]  Moderate
Screening - Winter [2]  Moderate
Shade Percentage [1]  83 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 10 Low Temperature: 30 F° (-1.1 C°) → 40 F° (4.4 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 11 Low Temperature: 40 F° (4.4 C°) → 50 F° (10 C°)
Light Preference [2]  Full Sun
Soil Acidity [2]  Neutral
Soil Fertility [2]  Infertile
Water Use [1]  Moderate to Low
Flower Color [2]  Red
Foliage Color [2]  Dark Green
Fruit Color [2]  Brown
Flower Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Fruit Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Bloom Period [2]  Winter
Drought Tolerance [2]  Medium
Edible [3]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Fire Tolerance [2]  None
Flower Type [3]  Hermaphrodite
Frost Free Days [2]  6 months
Fruit/Seed Abundance [2]  High
Fruit/Seed Begin [2]  Winter
Fruit/Seed End [2]  Fall
Growth Form [2]  Single Stem
Growth Period [2]  Spring, Summer, Fall
Growth Rate [2]  Rapid
Hazards [3]  Citronellal, an essential oil found in most Eucalyptus species is reported to be mutagenic when used in isolation; In large doses, oil of eucalyptus, like so many essential oils has caused fatalities from intestinal irritation; Death is reported from ingestion of 4 - 24 ml of essential oils, but recoveries are also reported for the same amount; Symptoms include gastroenteric burning and irritation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, oxygen deficiency, ,weakness, dizziness, stupor, difficult respiration, delirium, paralysis, convulsions, and death, usually due to respiratory failure;
Janka Hardness [4]  2470 lbf (1120 kgf) Very Hard
Leaf Type [3]  Evergreen
Pollinators [3]  Bees
Propagation [2]  Bare Root, Container, Seed
Root Depth [2]  20 inches (51 cm)
Seed Spread Rate [2]  Slow
Seed Vigor [2]  High
Seeds Per [2]  6800 / lb (14991 / kg)
Shape/Orientation [2]  Erect
Specific Gravity [5]  0.861
Structure [3]  Tree
Usage [3]  An orange dye is obtained from the leaves and green seedpods. It does not require a mordant; Wood - pale, tough, strong and durable;
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  None
View Plants For A Future Record : Eucalyptus leucoxylon

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Wyperfeld National Park II 890865 Victoria, Australia

Predators

Apiomorpha ovicola[6]
Apiomorpha urnalis[6]
Declana floccosa (Forest Semilooper)[7]
Liothula omnivora[8]
Mnesampela privata (Autumn gum moth)[9]
Opisthoscelis maculata[6]
Opodiphthera eucalypti (emperor gum moth)[10]
Phylacteophaga froggatti[8]
Trachymela sloanei[8]
Xanthomyza phrygia (Regent Honeyeater)[11]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Criconema pasticum <Unverified Name>[9]
Hemicriconemoides minor <Unverified Name>[9]
Hemicycliophora arenaria <Unverified Name>[9]
Loofia acuta <Unverified Name>[9]
Shelter for 
Calyptorhynchus banksii (Red-tailed Black Cockatoo)[12]

Distribution

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
3Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Wood Janka Hardness Scale/Chart J W Morlan's Unique Wood Gifts
5Chave J, Coomes D, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Swenson NG, Zanne AE (2009) Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Ecology Letters 12: 351-366. Zanne AE, Lopez-Gonzalez G, Coomes DA, Ilic J, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Miller RB, Swenson NG, Wiemann MC, Chave J (2009) Data from: Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Dryad Digital Repository.
6Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
7New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
10HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
11Regent Honeyeater (Xanthomyza phrygia) Recovery Plan 1999 - 2003, Peter Menkhorst, Natasha Schedvin and David Geering, Australia Department of Natural Resources and Environment, May 1999
12Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo – about the species Fact Sheet, Published by the Victorian Government Department of Sustainability and Environment Melbourne, September, 2005
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access