Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Cucurbitales > Cucurbitaceae > Momordica > Momordica balsamina
 

Momordica balsamina (southern balsampear)

Synonyms: Cucumis agrestis; Momordica garipensis; Momordica garriepensis; Momordica huberii; Momordica involucrata; Momordica schinzii; Nevrosperma cuspidata

Wikipedia Abstract

Momordica balsamina is a tendril-bearing annual vine native to the tropical regions of Africa, introduced and invasive in Asia, Australia, and Central America. It has pale yellow, deeply veined flowers and round, somewhat warty, bright orange fruits, or "apples". When ripe, the fruits burst apart, revealing numerous seeds covered with a brilliant scarlet, extremely sticky coating. The balsam apple was introduced into Europe by 1568 and was used medicinally to treat wounds. In 1810, Thomas Jefferson planted this vine in his flower borders at Monticello along with larkspur, poppies, and nutmeg.
View Wikipedia Record: Momordica balsamina

Attributes

Lifespan [1]  Annual
Structure [2]  Herb

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Dinder National Park II 2088300 Sudan  
Kruger National Park II 4718115 Mpumalanga, South Africa

Predators

Anastrepha suspensa (Caribbean fruit fly)[3]
Pulvinaria urbicola (urbicola soft scale)[4]
Saissetia coffeae (brown scale)[4]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Svalbard Global Seed Vault

Distribution

North America;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
2Kattge, J. et al. (2011b) TRY - a global database of plant traits Global Change Biology 17:2905-2935
3Norrbom, A.L. 2004. Fruit fly (Tephritidae) host plant database. Version Nov, 2004.
4Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access