Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Rodentia > Muridae > Lemmiscus > Lemmiscus curtatus
 

Lemmiscus curtatus (sagebrush vole)

Synonyms: Arvicola curtata; Arvicola decurtata; Lagurus curtatus

Wikipedia Abstract

The Sagebrush Vole (Lemmiscus curtatus) is a tiny vole found in western North America. This is the only member of genus Lemmiscus. They are somewhat similar in appearance to lemmings. They have chunky bodies with short legs and a very short tail which is covered in fur and lighter below. They have fluffy dull grey fur with lighter underparts. They are 12 cm long with a 2 cm tail and weigh about 27 g.
View Wikipedia Record: Lemmiscus curtatus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
21
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.57
EDGE Score: 2.15

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  26 grams
Birth Weight [1]  1.5 grams
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Gestation [1]  25 days
Litter Size [1]  5

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Map Climate Land
Use
Blue Mountains forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Cascade Mountains leeward forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Central and Southern Cascades forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Colorado Plateau shrublands United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Colorado Rockies forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Eastern Cascades forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Great Basin montane forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Great Basin shrub steppe United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Mojave desert United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Montana Valley and Foothill grasslands Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Northern mixed grasslands Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Northern short grasslands Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Okanagan dry forests Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Palouse grasslands United States Nearctic Temperate Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Sierra Nevada forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Snake-Columbia shrub steppe United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
South Central Rockies forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Wasatch and Uinta montane forests United States Nearctic Temperate Coniferous Forests
Wyoming Basin shrub steppe United States Nearctic Deserts and Xeric Shrublands

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Map Climate Land Use
Bryce Canyon National Park II 36348 Utah, United States
Dinosaur National Monument III 203307 Colorado, Utah, United States
Grand Teton National Park II 231724 Wyoming, United States
Grasslands National Park II 128635 Saskatchewan, Canada
Great Basin National Park II 77367 Nevada, United States
Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area V 103172 Washington, United States
Zion National Park II 135667 Utah, United States

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website Map
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No

Prey / Diet

Achillea distans subsp. tanacetifolia (Yarrow)[1]
Agropyron desertorum (clustered wheat grass)[1]
Alyssum alyssoides (pale madwort)[1]
Artemisia frigida (Fringed sagewort)[1]
Artemisia tridentata (sagebrush)[1]
Astragalus cusickii (Cusick's milkvetch)[1]
Bromus tectorum (military grass)[1]
Caulanthus lasiophyllus (California mustard)[1]
Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus (yellow rabbitbrush)[1]
Eriogonum strictum (Blue Mountain buckwheat)[1]
Erodium cicutarium (redstem)[1]
Eurotia lanata (winterfat)[1]
Holcus lanatus (common velvetgrass)[1]
Lomatium nevadense (Nevada desert-parsley)[1]
Medicago sativa (yellow alfalfa)[1]
Poa bulbosa (bulbous bluegrass)[1]
Selaginella densa (lesser spikemoss)[1]
Stipa spartea (shortbristle needle and thread)[1]
Taeniatherum caput-medusae (medusahead rye)[1]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Accipiter gentilis (Northern Goshawk)1
Adelphocoris lineolatus (alfalfa plant bug)1
Alectoris chukar (Chukar Partridge)1
Ammospermophilus nelsoni (Nelson's antelope squirrel)1
Antilocapra americana (pronghorn)1
Baliothrips dispar1
Brachylagus idahoensis (Pygmy Rabbit)3
Bruchidius villosus (broom seed beetle)2
Bubo virginianus (Great Horned Owl)1
Buteo jamaicensis (Red-tailed Hawk)1
Canis latrans (Coyote)1
Capsus ater1
Chaetodipus penicillatus (desert pocket mouse)1
Chlamydatus pullus1
Chrysolina marginata1
Chrysolina staphylaea1
Cynomys ludovicianus (black-tailed prairie dog)1
Dipodomys elator (Texas kangaroo rat)1
Dipodomys ingens (giant kangaroo rat)1
Dipodomys ordii (Ord's kangaroo rat)1
Leptopterna dolabrata (meadow plant bug)1
Lepus californicus (Black-tailed Jackrabbit)2
Lepus townsendii (White-tailed Jackrabbit)3
Longitarsus succineus1
Lygus rugulipennis1
Lynx rufus (Bobcat)1
Marmota flaviventris (yellow-bellied marmot)1
Martes americana (American Marten)1
Megalocoleus molliculus1
Microtus townsendii (Townsend's vole)2
Mustela frenata (Long-tailed Weasel)1
Neotoma cinerea (bushy-tailed woodrat)2
Neotoma lepida (desert woodrat)1
Onychomys leucogaster (northern grasshopper mouse)1
Orthocephalus coriaceus1
Ovis canadensis (bighorn sheep)2
Perognathus merriami (Merriam's pocket mouse)1
Phytocoris varipes1
Plagiognathus chrysanthemi1
Reithrodontomys megalotis (western harvest mouse)1
Spermophilus brunneus (Idaho ground squirrel)2
Spermophilus columbianus (Columbian ground squirrel)4
Spermophilus washingtoni (Washington ground squirrel)1
Stenotus binotatus (Two-spotted Grass Bug)1
Thrips tabaci (Onion thrip)1
Thrips vulgatissimus1
Zapus trinotatus (Pacific jumping mouse)1

Predators

Asio flammeus (Short-eared Owl)[1]
Asio otus (Long-eared Owl)[1]
Athene cunicularia (Burrowing Owl)[3]
Bubo virginianus (Great Horned Owl)[1]
Crotalus viridis viridis (Prairie rattlesnake)[4]
Pituophis catenifer (Gopher Snake)[5]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Aetheca wagneri[6]
Amphipsylla sibirica pollionis[6]
Amphipsylla sibirica sibirica[6]
Amphipsylla washingtona[6]
Atyphloceras multidentatus multidentatus[6]
Catallagia decipiens[6]
Catallagia sculleni sculleni[6]
Epitedia wenmanni testor[6]
Malaraeus telchinus[6]
Megabothris clantoni johnsoni[6]
Megabothris clantoni princei[6]
Meringis hubbardi[6]
Meringis shannoni[6]
Opisodasys keeni[6]
Paranoplocephala maseri <Unverified Name>[7]
Peromyscopsylla hesperomys adelpha[6]
Rhadinopsylla fraterna[6]
Rhadinopsylla sectilis sectilis[6]
Thrassis bacchi johnsoni[6]

Range Map

Link to Map
North America;

Photos

Citations

Species recognized by Gardner A.L, 09-Jun-2004, ITIS Global: The Integrated Taxonomic Information System in Catalog of Life 2011
Attributes / relations provided by 1Lemmiscus curtatus, Lynn E. Carroll and Hugh H. Genoways, Mammalian Species No. 124, pp. 1-6 (1980) 2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org 3Comparative Diets of Burrowing Owls in Oregon and Washington, Gregory A. Green, Richard E. Fitzner, Robert G. Anthony and Lee E. Rogers, Northwest Science, Vol. 67, No. 2, 1993, pp. 88-93 4Diet of the Prairie Rattlesnake, Crotalus viridis viridis, in Southeastern Alberta, Margaret M. A. Hill, G. Lawrence Powell, and Anthony P. Russell, Canadian Field-Naturalist 115(2): 241-246 (2001) 5Feeding ecology of North American gopher snakes (Pituophis catenifer, Colubridae), JAVIER A. RODRÍGUEZ-ROBLES, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2002, 77, 165–183 6International Flea Database 7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 gis.wwfus.org/wildfinder
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Biodiversity Hotspots, Conservation International
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
EDGE analysis provided by EDGE of Existence programme, Zoological Society of London
Range map provided by Patterson, B. D., G. Ceballos, W. Sechrest, M. F. Tognelli, T. Brooks, L. Luna, P. Ortega, I. Salazar, and B. E. Young. 2007. Digital Distribution Maps of the Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, version 3.0. NatureServe, Arlington, Virginia, USA.
Data provided by NatureServe in collaboration with Bruce Patterson, Wes Sechrest, Marcelo Tognelli, Gerardo Ceballos, The Nature Conservancy—Migratory Bird Program, Conservation International—CABS, World Wildlife Fund—US, and Environment Canada—WILDSPACE.
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access