Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Diprotodontia > Macropodidae > Dendrolagus > Dendrolagus scottae
 

Dendrolagus scottae (Tenkile)

Wikipedia Abstract

The tenkile (Dendrolagus scottae), also known as Scott's tree-kangaroo, is a species of tree-kangaroo in the family Macropodidae. It is endemic to a very small area of the Torricelli Mountains of Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss and by hunting. The Tenkile, are listed as endangered due to hunting and logging activities in Papua New Guinea. The Tenkile is hunted for its meat, Tenkile is the main protein source for the residents of Papua New Guinea. The population of Papua New Guinea has increased in recent years due to improvements in healthcare; therefore increasing need in Tenkile meat which means that more Tenkiles are being hunted. Additionally, Tenkiles are poached for their fur and are captured and sold as a
View Wikipedia Record: Dendrolagus scottae

Endangered Species

Status: Critically Endangered
View IUCN Record: Dendrolagus scottae

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
61
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.9
EDGE Score: 4.7

Attributes

Adult Weight [2]  22.87 lbs (10.38 kg)
Diet [3]  Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  50 %
Diet - Plants [3]  50 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Arboreal [1]  Yes

Predators

Homo sapiens (man)[4]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Cloacina cretheis <Unverified Name>[5]
Cloacina eurynome <Unverified Name>[5]
Dorcopsinema dendrolagi <Unverified Name>[5]

Range Map

Australia;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Felisa A. Smith, S. Kathleen Lyons, S. K. Morgan Ernest, Kate E. Jones, Dawn M. Kaufman, Tamar Dayan, Pablo A. Marquet, James H. Brown, and John P. Haskell. 2003. Body mass of late Quaternary mammals. Ecology 84:3403
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access