Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Pelecaniformes > Ardeidae > Ardea > Ardea insignis
 

Ardea insignis (White-bellied Heron)

Synonyms: Ardea imperialis

Wikipedia Abstract

The white-bellied heron (Ardea insignis), also known as the imperial heron or great white-bellied heron, is a species of large heron found in the foothills of the eastern Himalayas in India, northeastern Bangladesh, Burma and Bhutan. Additionally, there are records from Nepal. It is mostly dark grey with a white throat and underparts. This heron is mostly solitary and is found on undisturbed riverside or wetland habitats.
View Wikipedia Record: Ardea insignis

Endangered Species

Status: Critically Endangered
View IUCN Record: Ardea insignis

EDGE Analysis

The White-bellied Heron is the second largest heron in the world, with adults standing at well over a metre tall. Much of this height is due to its long slender neck. The heron is a riverine species and is strongly associated with waterbodies and adjacent forested habitat. It was once common in Myanmar and found in many other Asian countries. Today, it is known from about ten localities in India, Bhutan and Myanmar. Waterbodies in protected areas are still being converted to farmland and poaching is an ongoing threat at key sites.
Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
10
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
75
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.40234
EDGE Score: 5.01355
View EDGE Record: Ardea insignis

Attributes

Clutch Size [1]  4
Top 100 Endangered [2]  Yes

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Eastern Himalayan broadleaf forests India, Nepal Indo-Malayan Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests
Irrawaddy dry forests Myanmar Indo-Malayan Tropical and Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests
Irrawaddy freshwater swamp forests Myanmar Indo-Malayan Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Irrawaddy moist deciduous forests Myanmar Indo-Malayan Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Lower Gangetic Plains moist deciduous forests Bangladesh, India Indo-Malayan Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Myanmar Coast mangroves India, Myanmar, Malaysia, Thailand Indo-Malayan Mangroves  
Myanmar coastal rain forests Myanmar, Bangladesh Indo-Malayan Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Northern Indochina subtropical forests China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam Indo-Malayan Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
South China-Vietnam subtropical evergreen forests China, Viet Nam Indo-Malayan Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Buxa Tiger Reserve Sanctuary IV 23685 West Bengal, India  
Manas National Park II 135025 Assam, India
Sunderban National Park 261613 India  

Important Bird Areas

BirdLife Species Factsheet: View Factsheet
Name Location  IBA Criteria   Website   Climate   Land Use 
Ada lake / Puna Tsangchu Bhutan A1, A4i
Ayeyarwaddy River: Bhamo: Shwegu Myanmar A1, A4i
Bordoloni: Sampora India A1, A2, A4i
Dibru: Saikhowa Complex India A1, A2
Hkakabo Razi National Park Myanmar A1, A3, A4i
Hponkan Razi Wildlife Sanctuary Myanmar A1, A2, A3, A4i
Hukaung Valley Wildlife Sanctuary Myanmar A1, A3, A4i
Jamjing and Sengajan India A1
Jigme Dorji National Park Bhutan A1, A2, A3, A4i
Kaziranga National Park India A1, A2, A4i, A4iii
Lawachara / West Bhanugach Reserved Forest Bangladesh A1, A3
Manabum and Tengapani Reserve Forests India A1, A4i
Namdapha: Kamlang India A1, A2
Nameri National Park India A1, A2
Namsangmukh: Borduria India A1, A2
Nan Sam Chaung Myanmar A1, A4i
Pabitora Wildlife Sanctuary India A1, A2, A4iii
Upper Dihing (East) Complex India A1, A2
Upper Dihing (West) Complex India A1, A2

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Himalaya Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan Yes

Range Map

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303 2Baillie, J.E.M. & Butcher, E. R. (2012) Priceless or Worthless? The world’s most threatened species. Zoological Society of London, United Kingdom.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access