Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Perissodactyla > Tapiridae > Tapirus > Tapirus pinchaque
 

Tapirus pinchaque (mountain tapir)

Synonyms: Tapirus aenigmaticus; Tapirus ecuadorensis; Tapirus terrestris aenigmaticus; Tapirus terrestris peruvianus

Wikipedia Abstract

The mountain tapir or woolly tapir (Tapirus pinchaque) is the second smallest of the five species of tapir, only the recently described Tapirus kabomani being smaller, and is the only one to live outside of tropical rainforests in the wild. It is most easily distinguished from other tapirs by its thick woolly coat and white lips.The species name comes from the term "La Pinchaque", an imaginary beast said to inhabit the same regions as the mountain tapir.
View Wikipedia Record: Tapirus pinchaque

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Tapirus pinchaque

EDGE Analysis

The smallest and most endangered of the four species of tapir, the mountain tapir survives in a few remaining undisturbed refuges high in the Andes. It is also known as the woolly tapir because of its thick woolly fur, which keeps it warm in freezing night-time temperatures. Like other tapirs, this species has a long prehensile nose capable of grasping leaves. It is hunted for its meat, pelt and body parts, which are used in traditional folk medicine. Fewer than 2,500 are thought to survive.
Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
11
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
70
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 23.71
EDGE Score: 5.29
View EDGE Record: Tapirus pinchaque

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  328.38 lbs (148.95 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  9.41 lbs (4.27 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Gestation [1]  1 year 1 month
Litter Size [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  29 years
Weaning [3]  90 days

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Apure-Villavicencio dry forests Colombia, Venezuela Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests
Cauca Valley dry forests Colombia Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests
Cauca Valley montane forests Colombia Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Cordillera Central páramo Ecuador, Peru Neotropic Montane Grasslands and Shrublands
Cordillera Oriental montane forests Colombia, Venezuela Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Eastern Cordillera real montane forests Ecuador, Colombia, Peru Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Magdalena Valley dry forests Colombia Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests
Magdalena Valley montane forests Colombia Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Napo moist forests Colombia, Venezuela, Peru Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Northern Andean páramo Ecuador, Colombia Neotropic Montane Grasslands and Shrublands
Northwestern Andean montane forests Colombia, Ecuador Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Patía Valley dry forests Colombia Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Cayambe-Coca Ecological Reserve VI 921676 Ecuador  
Cinturon Andino Cluster Biosphere Reserve 433176 Colombia  

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No

Prey / Diet

Ceroxylon quindiuense (Wax Palm)[3]
Chusquea scandens[3]
Espeletia grandiflora[3]
Gunnera brephogea[3]
Gunnera manicata (giant rhubarb)[3]
Oxalis integra[3]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Ognorhynchus icterotis (Yellow-eared Parrot)1

Predators

Puma concolor (Cougar)[3]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Cheyenne Mtn Zoological Park
Fundacion Zoologica de Cali
Los Angeles Zoo & Botanical Gardens
Mountain View Conservation & Breeding

Range Map

Patfa Valley dry forests; South America;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by 1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774 2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org 3Tapirus pinchaque (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae), MIGUEL PADILLA, ROBERT C. DOWLER, AND CRAIG C. DOWNER, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(863):166–182 (2010)
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access