Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Chiroptera > Pteropodidae > Pteropus > Pteropus alecto
 

Pteropus alecto (black flying fox)

Synonyms: Pteropus banakrisi

Wikipedia Abstract

The black flying fox or black fruit bat (Pteropus alecto) is a bat in the family Pteropodidae. It is among the largest bats in the world, but is considerably smaller than the largest species in its genus, Pteropus. The black flying fox is native to Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. It is not a threatened species.
View Wikipedia Record: Pteropus alecto

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
15
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.88
EDGE Score: 1.77

Attributes

Adult Weight [2]  1.48 lbs (672 g)
Diet [3]  Frugivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  100 %
Forages - Arboreal [3]  100 %
Arboreal [1]  Yes
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  20 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Arnhem Land tropical savanna Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Brigalow tropical savanna Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Cape York Peninsula tropical savanna Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Carnarvon xeric shrublands Australia Australasia Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Carpentaria tropical savanna Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Eastern Australian temperate forests Australia Australasia Temperate Broadleaf and Mixed Forests
Eastern Java-Bali rain forests Indonesia Indo-Malayan Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Einasleigh upland savanna Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Great Sandy-Tanami desert Australia Australasia Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Kimberly tropical savanna Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Lesser Sundas deciduous forests Indonesia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests  
Mitchell grass downs Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Pilbara shrublands Australia Australasia Deserts and Xeric Shrublands
Queensland tropical rain forests Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests  
Southern New Guinea freshwater swamp forests Indonesia, Papua New Guinea Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Sumba deciduous forests Indonesia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests
Timor and Wetar deciduous forests East Timor, Indonesia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Dry Broadleaf Forests
Trans Fly savanna and grasslands Indonesia, Papua New Guinea Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Victoria Plains tropical savanna Australia Australasia Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands
Western Australian Mulga shrublands Australia Australasia Deserts and Xeric Shrublands

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Crater Lakes National Park II 2320 Queensland, Australia
Kakadu National Park II 4744348 Northern Territory, Australia
Lamington National Park II 50970 Queensland, Australia
Prince Regent River Nature Reserve Ia 1428602 Western Australia, Australia  
Shoalwater and Corio Bays Area Ramsar Site   Queensland, Australia
Wasur-Rawa Biru National Park 605464 Papua, Indonesia  

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Sundaland Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand No
Wallacea East Timor, Indonesia No

Prey / Diet

Albizia lebbeck (raom tree)[4]
Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay Fig)[5]
Ficus minahassae (clustertree)[5]
Ficus opposita[5]
Ficus scobina[5]
Ficus virens[5]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Cyclopsitta diophthalma (Double-eyed Fig Parrot)2
Ducula bicolor (Pied Imperial Pigeon)3
Eudynamys scolopaceus (Asian Koel)3
Hylobates lar (white-handed gibbon)2
Irena puella (Asian Fairy-bluebird)2
Lopholaimus antarcticus (Topknot Pigeon)2
Macaca fascicularis (long-tailed macaque)2
Melursus ursinus (Sloth Bear)2
Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan)2
Pteropus poliocephalus (gray-headed flying fox)2
Ptilinopus cinctus (Banded Fruit Dove)3
Ptilinopus magnificus (Wompoo Fruit Dove)2
Ptilinopus regina (Rose-crowned Fruit Dove)2
Scythrops novaehollandiae (Channel-billed Cuckoo)3
Trichoglossus haematodus (Coconut Lorikeet)2

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Cyclopodia australis[6]
Toxocara pteropodis <Unverified Name>[7]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Territory Wildlife Park (Berry Springsgouldi

Range Map

Australia; Southern Asia;

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Folivory in Fruit-Eating Bats, with New Evidence from Artibeus jamaicensis (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae), Thomas H. Kunz and Carlos A. Diaz, Biotropica, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Mar., 1995), pp. 106-120
5"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Images provided by Google Image Search
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Weather provided by NOAA METAR Data Access