Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Carnivora > Mustelidae > Neovison > Neovison vison
 

Neovison vison (American Mink)

Synonyms: Mustela vison

Wikipedia Abstract

The American mink (Neovison vison) is a semiaquatic species of mustelid native to North America, though human intervention has expanded its range to many parts of Europe and South America. Because of range expansion, the American mink is classed as a least-concern species by the IUCN. Since the extinction of the sea mink, the American mink is the only extant member of the genus Neovison. The American mink is a carnivore which feeds on rodents, fish, crustaceans, frogs, and birds. In its introduced range in Europe it has been classified as an invasive species linked to declines in European mink, Pyrenean desman, and water vole populations. It is the most frequently farmed animal for its fur, exceeding the silver fox, sable, marten, and skunk in economic importance.
View Wikipedia Record: Neovison vison

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
24
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 9.14
EDGE Score: 2.32

Attributes

Gestation [3]  42 days
Litter Size [3]  5
Litters / Year [3]  1
Maximum Longevity [3]  11 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams, Coastal
Weaning [3]  49 days
Adult Weight [2]  2.172 lbs (985 g)
Birth Weight [3]  9 grams
Female Weight [2]  1.574 lbs (714 g)
Male Weight [2]  2.769 lbs (1.256 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [2]  75.9 %
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Ectothermic [4]  20 %
Diet - Endothermic [4]  50 %
Diet - Fish [4]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  10 %
Forages - Ground [4]  100 %
Female Maturity [3]  11 months 4 days
Male Maturity [3]  1 year

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (189)

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Crotalus horridus (Timber rattlesnake (atricaudatus))[15]
Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle)[5]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Mustela vison, Serge Larivière, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 608, pp. –9 (1999)
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Anurans as prey: an exploratory analysis and size relationships between predators and their prey, L. F. Toledo, R. S. Ribeiro & C. F. B. Haddad, Journal of Zoology 271 (2007) 170–177
7Microtus townsendii, John E. Cornely and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 325, pp. 1-9 (1988)
8Myotis sodalis, Christine E. Thomson, Mammalian Species No. 163, pp. 1-5 (1982)
9Napaeozapus insignis, John O. Whitaker, Jr., and Robert E. Wrigley, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 14, pp. 1-6 (1972)
10Oryzomys palustris, James L. Wolfe, Mammalian Species No. 176, pp. 1-5 (1982)
11Spermophilus franklinii, Andrea C. Ostroff and Elmer J. Finck, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 724, pp. 1–5 (2003)
12Sylvilagus audubonii, Joseph A. Chapman and Gale R. Willner, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 106, pp. 1-4 (1978)
13Spermophilus beldingi, Stephen H. Jenkins and Bruce D. Eshelman, Mammalian Species No. 221, pp. 1-8 (1984)
14Spermophilus richardsonii, Gail R. Michener and James W. Koeppl, Mammalian Species No. 243, pp. 1-8, (1985)
15Diet of the Timber Rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus, Rulon W. Clark, Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 494-499, 2002
16Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
17International Flea Database
18Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License