Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Apiales > Araliaceae > Hedera > Hedera helix
 

Hedera helix (Algerian ivy; English ivy)

Synonyms: Hedera communis; Hedera helix var. vulgaris; Hedera poetica

Wikipedia Abstract

Hedera helix (common ivy, English ivy, European ivy, or just ivy) is a species of flowering plant in the family Araliaceae, native to most of Europe and western Asia. A rampant, clinging evergreen vine, it is a familiar sight in gardens, waste spaces, on house walls, tree trunks and in wild areas across its native habitat. It is labeled as an invasive species in a number of areas where it has been introduced.
View Wikipedia Record: Hedera helix

Infraspecies

Attributes

Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-High
Edible [2]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [2]  Hermaphrodite
Hazards [2]  The plant is said to be poisonous in large doses[7, 10, 65, 76] although the leaves are eaten with impunity by various mammals without any noticeable harmful affects. The leaves and fruits contain the saponic glycoside hederagenin which, if ingested, can cause breathing difficulties and coma; The sap can cause dermatitis with blistering and inflammation. This is apparently due to the presence of polyacetylene compounds;
Leaf Type [2]  Evergreen
Lifespan [3]  Perennial
Pollinators [2]  Bees, Flies, Lepidoptera
Structure [2]  Vine
Usage [2]  A yellow and a brown dye are obtained from the twigs; A decoction of the leaves is used to restore black fabrics; If the leaves are boiled with soda they are a soap substitute for washing clothes etc; An excellent ground cover for shady places, succeeding even in the dense shade of trees; A very effective weed suppresser; The cultivars 'Hibernica', 'Lutzii' and 'Neilsonii' have been especially mentioned; Plants can be grown along fences to form a hedge. The variety 'Digitata' is very useful for this; Plants have been grown indoors in pots in order to help remove toxins from the atmosphere. It is especially good at removing chemical vapours, especially formaldehyde; The plants will probably benefit from being placed outdoors during the summer; The wood is very hard and can be used as a substitute for Buxus sempervirens (Box), used in engraving etc; Another report says that the wood is very soft and porous and is seldom used except as a strop for sharpening knives;
Height [2]  49 feet (15 m)
Width [2]  16.4 feet (5 m)
Light Preference [4]  Mostly Shady
Soil Acidity [4]  Neutral
Soil Fertility [4]  Intermediate
Soil Moisture [4]  Moist
View Plants For A Future Record : Hedera helix

Protected Areas

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Ecosystems

Predators

Providers

Parasite of 
Platanus orientalis (oriental planetree)[8]
Pollinated by 
Vespa orientalis (Oriental hornet)[8]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Orobanche hederae (Ivy broomrape)[8]
Phyllactinia guttata[8]
Pollinator of 
Vespa orientalis (Oriental hornet)[8]

Distribution

Europe, Medit. to Iran;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Derived from Allergy-Free Gardening OPALS™, Thomas Leo Ogren (2000)
2Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
3PLANTATT - Attributes of British and Irish Plants: Status, Size, Life History, Geography and Habitats, M. O. Hill, C. D. Preston & D. B. Roy, Biological Records Centre, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (2004)
4ECOFACT 2a Technical Annex - Ellenberg’s indicator values for British Plants, M O Hill, J O Mountford, D B Roy & R G H Bunce (1999)
5Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
6Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
7HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
10Recruitment of a Mast-Fruiting, Bird-Dispersed Tree: Bridging Frugivore Activity and Seedling Establishment, Carlos M. Herrera, Pedro Jordano, Luis López-Soria, Juan A. Amat, Ecological Monographs, 64(3), 1994, pp. 315-344
11Dama dama, George A. Feldhamer, Kelly C. Farris-Renner, and Celeste M. Barker, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 317, pp. 1-8 (1988)
12Birds and berries: a study of an ecological interaction. Calton, Great Britain, Snow B.K., Snow D.W., 1988, T & AD Poyser. 268 p.
Protected Areas provided by Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License