Animalia > Chordata > Reptilia > Testudines > Chelydridae > Chelydra > Chelydra serpentina
 

Chelydra serpentina (Common Snapping Turtle)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

The common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) is a large freshwater turtle of the family Chelydridae. Its natural range extends from southeastern Canada, southwest to the edge of the Rocky Mountains, as far east as Nova Scotia and Florida. This species and the larger alligator snapping turtle are the only two species in this family found in North America (though the common snapping turtle, as its name implies, is much more widespread).
View Wikipedia Record: Chelydra serpentina

Attributes

Maximum Longevity [2]  47 years
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams
Adult Weight [2]  22.597 lbs (10.25 kg)
Diet [1]  Omnivore
Female Maturity [2]  9 years
Male Maturity [2]  7 years 3 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No
Tumbes-Choco-Magdalena Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru No

Emblem of

New York

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

S Canada (from Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and S Quebec, west to SE Alberta), USA (east of the Rocky Mountains and south to the Texas coast: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, ;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5The Breeding Ecology of Least Bitterns (Ixobrychus exilis) at Agassiz and Mingo National Wildlife Refuges, Karen Elizabeth Arnold, Thesis for Master of Science Major in Wildlife and Fisheries South Dakota State University 2005
6del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Calvin College Ecosystem Preserve
Edwin S. George Reserve, University of Michigan, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License