Animalia > Chordata > Reptilia > Squamata > Varanidae > Varanus > Varanus exanthematicus
 

Varanus exanthematicus (Savannah Monitor)

Synonyms: Lacerta exanthematicus; Varanus exanthematicus ocellatus; Varanus ocellatus

Wikipedia Abstract

The savannah monitor (Varanus exanthematicus) is a medium-sized species of monitor lizard native to Africa. The species is known as Bosc's monitor in Europe, since French scientist Louis Bosc first described the species. It belongs to the subgenus Polydaedalus, along with the Nile, the ornate and other monitors.
View Wikipedia Record: Varanus exanthematicus

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  78.265 lbs (35.50 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  7 grams
Female Weight [2]  425 grams
Clutch Size [2]  20
Incubation [2]  5 months 2 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  13 years
Snout to Vent Length [2]  13 inches (34 cm)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Eastern Afromontane Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zimbabwe No
Horn of Africa Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Oman, Somalia, Yemen No

Prey / Diet

Madoqua guentheri (Günther's dik-dik)[3]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Bucorvus leadbeateri (Southern Ground Hornbill)[4]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Duthiersia fimbriata[5]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Senegal, Gambia, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Mali, Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Togo, Benin, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Uganda, N Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zair;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
3Madoqua guentheri, Steven C. Kingswood and Arlene T. Kumamoto, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 539, pp. 1-10 (1996)
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License