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Vespula germanica (European wasp)

Synonyms: Vespa macularis

Wikipedia Abstract

Vespula germanica (European wasp, German wasp, or German yellowjacket) is a species of wasp found in much of the Northern Hemisphere, native to Europe, Northern Africa, and temperate Asia. It has been introduced and is well-established in many other places, including North America, South America (Argentina and Chile), Australia, and New Zealand. German wasps are part of the family Vespidae and are sometimes mistakenly referred to as paper wasps because they build grey paper nests, although strictly speaking, paper wasps are part of the subfamily Polistinae. In North America, they are also known as yellowjackets.
View Wikipedia Record: Vespula germanica

Invasive Species

Vespula germanica, commonly known as the German or European wasp, is a social wasp species. In introduced regions, where it is often more successful than in its native range, it efficiently exploits important food resources, such as nectar and insects, that native fauna may depend on. V. germanica displays many characteristics that make a species a successful invader and a new colony can be established from a single inseminated female.
View ISSG Record: Vespula germanica

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Chamaelaucium uncinatum (Geraldton wax)[1]
Mesembrina meridiana (Mid-day Fly)[2]
Tanacetum bipinnatum subsp. bipinnatum (Tansy)[2]

Predators

Consumers

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
2Ecology of Commanster
3Predator-Prey Database for the family Asilidae (Hexapoda: Diptera) Prepared by Dr. Robert Lavigne, Professor Emeritus, University of Wyoming, USA and Dr. Jason Londt (Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg)
4Diet composition and prey choice by the red-backed shrike Lanius collurio in western Poland, Piotr Tryjanowski, Malgorzata Karolina Karg, Jerzy Karg, Belg. J. Zool., 133 (2) : 157-162 (2003)
5OBSERVATIONS ON THE DIET AND FEEDING HABITS OF THE SHORT-BEAKED ECHIDNA (TACHYGLOSSUS ACULEATUS) IN TASMANIA, Chris P. Spencer & Karen Richards, The Tasmanian Naturalist 131 (2009), p. 36-41
6Vázquez, D. P. 2002. Interactions among Introduced Ungulates, Plants, and Pollinators: A Field Study in the Temperate Forest of the Southern Andes. Doctoral Dissertation thesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA.
7Robertson, C. Flowers and insects lists of visitors of four hundred and fifty three flowers. 1929. The Science Press Printing Company Lancaster, PA.
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