Animalia > Chordata > Amphibia > Anura > Bufonidae > Rhinella > Rhinella marina
 

Rhinella marina (Cane Toad)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

The cane toad (Rhinella marina), also known as the giant neotropical toad or marine toad, is a large, terrestrial true toad which is native to South and mainland Middle America, but has been introduced to various islands throughout Oceania and the Caribbean, as well as northern Australia. It is a member of the genus Rhinella, but was formerly in the genus Bufo, which includes many different true toad species found throughout Central and South America. The cane toad is a prolific breeder; females lay single-clump spawns with thousands of eggs. Its reproductive success is partly because of opportunistic feeding: it has a diet, unusual among anurans, of both dead and living matter. Adults average 10–15 cm (3.9–5.9 in) in length; the largest recorded specimen had a snount-vent length of 24 cm
View Wikipedia Record: Rhinella marina

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
13
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.14
EDGE Score: 1.64

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  106 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore
Female Maturity [1]  1 year
Male Maturity [1]  1 year
Gestation [1]  2 days
Litter Size [1]  10,000
Litters / Year [3]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  25 years
Nocturnal [2]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [3]  9 inches (24.1 cm)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Cerrado Brazil No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No
Tumbes-Choco-Magdalena Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru No

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3Oliveira, Brunno Freire; São-Pedro, Vinícius Avelar; Santos-Barrera, Georgina; Penone, Caterina; C. Costa, Gabriel. (2017) AmphiBIO, a global database for amphibian ecological traits. Sci. Data.
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Diet and reproduction of the Western Indigo Snake Drymarchon corais (Serpentes: Colubridae) from the Brazilian Amazon, Ana Lúcia da Costa Prudente, Alessandro Costa Menks, Fernanda Magalhães da Silva and Gleomar Fabiano Maschio, Herpetology Notes, volume 7: 99-108 (2014)
6Hábitos alimentares de serpentes em Espigão do Oeste, Rondônia, Brasil, Paulo Sérgio Bernarde & Augusto Shinya Abe, Biota Neotrop., vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 167-173 (2010)
7Predation on amphibians by spiders (Arachnida, Araneae) in the Neotropical region, Marcelo Menin, Domingos de Jesus Rodrigues and Clarissa Salette de Azevedo, Phyllomedusa 4(1):39-47, 2005
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
9Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License