Animalia > Chordata > Amphibia > Anura > Ranidae > Lithobates > Lithobates catesbeianus
 

Lithobates catesbeianus (American Bullfrog)

Synonyms: Rana catesbeiana

Wikipedia Abstract

The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus or Rana catesbeiana), often simply known as the bullfrog in Canada and the United States, is an amphibious frog, a member of the family Ranidae, or “true frogs”. This frog has an olive green back and sides blotched with brownish markings and a whitish belly spotted with yellow or grey. The upper lip is often bright green and males have yellow throats. It inhabits large, permanent water bodies, such as swamps, ponds, and lakes, where it is usually found along the water's edge. The male bullfrog defends a territory during the breeding season. His call is reminiscent of the roar of a bull, which gives the frog its common name. This frog is native to southern and eastern parts of the United States and Canada, but has been widely introduced across
View Wikipedia Record: Lithobates catesbeianus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
23
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.58
EDGE Score: 2.26

Attributes

Gestation [2]  4 days
Hibernates [1]  Yes
Litter Size [3]  16,750
Litters / Year [3]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  16 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [3]  8 inches (20.3 cm)
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams
Adult Weight [2]  54 grams
Diet [1]  Omnivore
Female Maturity [2]  3 years 6 months
Male Maturity [2]  2 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (117)

Ecosystems

Emblem of

Iowa
Missouri
Oklahoma

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Little River National Wildlife Refuge; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Oliveira, Brunno Freire; São-Pedro, Vinícius Avelar; Santos-Barrera, Georgina; Penone, Caterina; C. Costa, Gabriel. (2017) AmphiBIO, a global database for amphibian ecological traits. Sci. Data.
4Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Anurans as prey: an exploratory analysis and size relationships between predators and their prey, L. F. Toledo, R. S. Ribeiro & C. F. B. Haddad, Journal of Zoology 271 (2007) 170–177
7Resources of a Snake Community in Prairie-Woodland Habitat of Northeastern Kansas, Henry S. Fitch, U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Wildlife Research Report 13: 83-98 (1982)
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Calvin College Ecosystem Preserve
Carlsbad Caverns National Park
Edwin S. George Reserve, University of Michigan, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License