Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Rosales > Rosaceae > Prunus > Prunus domestica
 

Prunus domestica (plum)

Wikipedia Abstract

Prunus domestica (sometimes referred to as Prunus × domestica) is a species of flowering plant in the family Rosaceae. A deciduous tree, it includes many varieties of the fruit trees known as plums in English, though not all plums belong to this species. The greengages and damsons also belong to subspecies of P. domestica. Its hybrid parentage is believed to be Prunus spinosa and Prunus cerasifera. This is the most commonly grown plum at least in Europe, and most prunes (dried plums) are made from fruits of this species.
View Wikipedia Record: Prunus domestica

Infraspecies

Attributes

Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Edible [2]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [2]  Hermaphrodite
Hazards [2]  Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.
Leaf Type [2]  Deciduous
Lifespan [3]  Perennial
Pollinators [2]  Insects, Lepidoptera
Specific Gravity [5]  0.5
Structure [2]  Tree
Usage [2]  A green dye can be obtained from the leaves; A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit; A yellow dye is obtained from the bark; A gum obtained from points of damage along the stem can be used as an adhesive; The ground up seeds are used cosmetically in the production of face-masks for dry skin; A semi-drying oil is obtained from the seed; No details of its uses. Wood - hard, compact. Used for musical instruments;
Height [2]  39 feet (12 m)
Width [2]  33 feet (10 m)
Light Preference [4]  Mostly Sunny
Soil Acidity [4]  Neutral
Soil Fertility [4]  Intermediate
Soil Moisture [4]  Moist
View Plants For A Future Record : Prunus domestica

Protected Areas

Emblem of

China
Taiwan, Province Of China

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Derived from Allergy-Free Gardening OPALS™, Thomas Leo Ogren (2000)
2Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
3PLANTATT - Attributes of British and Irish Plants: Status, Size, Life History, Geography and Habitats, M. O. Hill, C. D. Preston & D. B. Roy, Biological Records Centre, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (2004)
4ECOFACT 2a Technical Annex - Ellenberg’s indicator values for British Plants, M O Hill, J O Mountford, D B Roy & R G H Bunce (1999)
5Forest Inventory and Analysis DB version 5.1, May 4, 2013, U.S. Forest Service
6HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
7Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
8Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
9Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
10Norrbom, A.L. 2004. Fruit fly (Tephritidae) host plant database. Version Nov, 2004.
11New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
12NOTES ON THE DIET OF THE CRIMSON-COLLARED GROSBEAK (RHODOTHRAUPIS CELAENO) IN NORTHEASTERN MEXICO, Jack Clinton Eitniear & Alvaro Aragon Tapia, ORNITOLOGIA NEOTROPICAL 11: 363–364, 2000
13Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License