Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Rosales > Rosaceae > Prunus > Prunus persica
 

Prunus persica (peach)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

The peach (Prunus persica) is a deciduous tree native to the region of Northwest China between the Tarim Basin and the north slopes of the Kunlun Shan mountains, where it was first domesticated and cultivated. It bears an edible juicy fruit called a peach or a nectarine. The People's Republic of China is the world's largest producer of peaches.
View Wikipedia Record: Prunus persica

Infraspecies

Attributes

Air Quality Improvement [1]  Low
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Carbon Capture [1]  Low
Shade Percentage [1]  80 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Low
Wind Reduction [1]  Low
Edible [2]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [2]  Hermaphrodite
Hazards [2]  The seed can contain high levels of hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is readily detected by its bitter taste. Usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm, any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten; In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.
Leaf Type [2]  Deciduous
Lifespan [3]  Perennial
Pollinators [2]  Bees
Specific Gravity [4]  0.5
Structure [2]  Tree
Usage [2]  A green dye can be obtained from the leaves; Yellow according to another report; A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit; A semi-drying oil is obtained from the seed; It is used as a substitute for almond oil in skin creams; The bruised leaves, when rubbed within any container, will remove strong odours such as garlic or cloves so long as any grease has first been fully cleaned off; A gum obtained from the stem is used as an adhesive;
Height [2]  20 feet (6 m)
Width [2]  20 feet (6 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 6 Low Temperature: -10 F° (-23.3 C°) → 0 F° (-17.8 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 8 Low Temperature: 10 F° (-12.2 C°) → 20 F° (-6.7 C°)
Water Use [1]  Moderate
View Plants For A Future Record : Prunus persica

Protected Areas

Emblem of

Delaware

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
3USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
4Forest Inventory and Analysis DB version 5.1, May 4, 2013, U.S. Forest Service
5HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
6Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
9Norrbom, A.L. 2004. Fruit fly (Tephritidae) host plant database. Version Nov, 2004.
10Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
11Jorge E. Schondube, Eduardo Santana C., Irma Ruan-Tejeda. (2003) Biannual Cycles of the Cinnamon-bellied Flowerpiercer Biotropica 35:2, 250-261
12Parabemisia myricae (Kuwana) (Insecta: Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae: Aleyrodinae), Avas B. Hamon, Ru Nguyen, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry, and Harold Browning, University of Florida, June 2000. Latest revision: August 2014
13The role of Orii’s flying-fox (Pteropus dasymallus inopinatus) as a pollinator and a seed disperser on Okinawa-jima Island, the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan; Atsushi Nakamoto, Kazumitsu Kinjo Masako Izawa; Ecol Res (2009) 24: 405–414
14DIET AND FEEDING BEHAVIOR OF THE REDDISH-BELLIED PARAKEET (PYRRHURA FRONTALIS) IN AN ARAUCARIA FOREST IN SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL, Giane C. Kristosch & Luiz O. Marcondes-Machado, ORNITOLOGIA NEOTROPICAL 12: 215–223, 2001
15Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) (Insecta: Diptera: Tephritidae), H.V. Weems, Jr., Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry; and T.R. Fasulo, University of Florida, January 2002. Latest revision: March 2015
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License