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Pinus strobus (Eastern white pine; Weymouth pine; White pine)

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Wikipedia Abstract

Pinus strobus, commonly known as the eastern white pine, white pine, northern white pine, Weymouth pine, and soft pine is a large pine native to eastern North America. It occurs from Newfoundland west through the Great Lakes region to southeastern Manitoba and Minnesota, and south along the Appalachian Mountains and upper Piedmont to northernmost Georgia and perhaps very rarely in some of the higher elevations in northeastern Alabama, and is planted in areas near its natural range where summer temperatures are fairly moderate.
View Wikipedia Record: Pinus strobus

Infraspecies

Attributes

Air Quality Improvement [1]  Low
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Carbon Capture [1]  Medium-Low
Shade Percentage [1]  83 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium-High
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium-High
Edible [2]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [2]  Monoecious
Hazards [2]  The wood, sawdust and resins from various species of pine can cause dermatitis in sensitive people;
Janka Hardness [3]  380 lbf (172 kgf) Very Soft
Leaf Type [2]  Evergreen
Pollinators [2]  Wind
Specific Gravity [4]  0.35
Structure [2]  Tree
Usage [2]  A tan or green dye is obtained from the needles; The needles contain a substance called terpene, this is released when rain washes over the needles and it has a negative effect on the germination of some plants, including wheat; Oleo-resins are present in the tissues of all species of pines, but these are often not present in sufficient quantity to make their extraction economically worthwhile; The resins are obtained by tapping the trunk, or by destructive distillation of the wood; In general, trees from warmer areas of distribution give the higher yields; Turpentine consists of an average of 20% of the oleo-resin; Turpentine has a wide range of uses including as a solvent for waxes etc, for making varnish, medicinal etc; Rosin is the substance left after turpentine is removed. This is used by violinists on their bows and also in making sealing wax, varnish etc; Pitch can also be obtained from the resin and is used for waterproofing canoes, containers etc, as a wood preservative etc; Wood - straight and close-grained, light, soft, not strong, works easily and takes an excellent natural or painted finish; It weighs 24lb per cubic foot; A very valuable timber;
Height [2]  66 feet (20 m)
Width [2]  16.4 feet (5 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 4 Low Temperature: -30 F° (-34.4 C°) → -20 F° (-28.9 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 7 Low Temperature: 0 F° (-17.8 C°) → 10 F° (-12.2 C°)
Water Use [1]  Moderate
View Plants For A Future Record : Pinus strobus

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Emblem of

Maine
Maine
Michigan
Ontario

Predators

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

E North America: from Newfoundland to N Georgia, westward to Manitoba and Minnesota; S Mexico; Guatemala (highlands). TDWG: 71 MAN 72 NBR NFL-NE NSC ONT PEI QUE 74 ILL IOW MIN WIS 75 CNT INI MAI MAS MIC NWH NWJ NWY OHI PEN RHO VER WVA 78 DEL GEO KTY MRY NCA SCA TEN VRG 79 MXC-PU MXG-VC MXS-GR MXS-OA MXT-CI 80 GUA; E North America: from Newfoundland to N Georgia, westward to Manitoba and Minnesota; S Mexico; Guatemala (highlands).. TDWG: 71 MAN 72 NBR NFL-NE NSC ONT PEI QUE 74 ILL IOW MIN WIS 75 CNT INI MAI MAS MIC NWH NWJ NWY OHI PEN RHO VER WVA 78 DEL GEO KTY MRY NCA SCA TEN VRG 79 MXC-PU MXG-VC MXS-GR MXS-OA MXT-CI 80 GUA;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
3Wood Janka Hardness Scale/Chart J W Morlan's Unique Wood Gifts
4Forest Inventory and Analysis DB version 5.1, May 4, 2013, U.S. Forest Service
5Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
6HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
7Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
8Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
9Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
10New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
11Black Turpentine Beetle, Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), Albert E. Mayfield III, Jiri Hulcr, and John L. Foltz, University of Florida
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License