Plantae > Tracheophyta > Pinopsida > Pinales > Pinaceae > Pinus > Pinus palustris
 

Pinus palustris (Georgia pine; Longleaf pine; Florida pine)

Synonyms: Pinus australis; Pinus australis var. excelsa; Pinus longifolia; Pinus palustris subsp. neogigantea; Pinus palustris var. excelsa
Language: Chi; Fre; Ger; Hrv, Srp; Hun; Ita; Rus; Spa

Wikipedia Abstract

Pinus palustris, commonly known as the longleaf pine, is a pine native to the southeastern United States, found along the coastal plain from eastern Texas to southeast Virginia, extending into northern and central Florida. It reaches a height of 30–35 m (98–115 ft) and a diameter of 0.7 m (28 in). In the past, they reportedly grew to 47 m (154 ft) with a diameter of 1.2 m (47 in).
View Wikipedia Record: Pinus palustris

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Pinus palustris

Attributes

Air Quality Improvement [1]  None
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Carbon Capture [1]  Medium
Screening - Summer [2]  Moderate
Screening - Winter [2]  Moderate
Shade Percentage [1]  83 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium-High
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium-High
Bloom Period [2]  Late Winter
Drought Tolerance [2]  Medium
Edible [3]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Fire Tolerance [2]  Medium
Flower Type [3]  Monoecious
Frost Free Days [2]  8 months 10 days
Fruit/Seed Abundance [2]  High
Fruit/Seed Begin [2]  Fall
Fruit/Seed End [2]  Winter
Growth Form [2]  Single Stem
Growth Period [2]  Spring, Summer
Growth Rate [2]  Rapid
Hazards [3]  The wood, sawdust and resins from various species of pine can cause dermatitis in sensitive people;
Janka Hardness [4]  870 lbf (395 kgf) Soft
Leaf Type [3]  Evergreen
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Pollinators [3]  Wind
Propagation [2]  Bare Root, Container, Seed
Root Depth [2]  3.346 feet (102 cm)
Seed Spread Rate [2]  Slow
Seed Vigor [2]  High
Seeds Per [2]  4240 / lb (9348 / kg)
Shape/Orientation [2]  Erect
Specific Gravity [5]  0.59
Structure [3]  Tree
Usage [3]  A tan or green dye is obtained from the needles; The needles contain a substance called terpene, this is released when rain washes over the needles and it has a negative effect on the germination of some plants, including wheat; Carpets are woven from the leaves; This species is exceedingly rich in resinous secretions and is a major source of resin and turpentine in America; The resins are obtained by tapping the trunk, or by destructive distillation of the wood; In general, trees from warmer areas of distribution give the higher yields; Turpentine consists of an average of 20% of the oleo-resin; Turpentine has a wide range of uses including as a solvent for waxes etc, for making varnish, perfumery, medicinal etc; Rosin is the substance left after turpentine is removed. This is used by violinists on their bows and also in making sealing wax, varnish etc; Pitch can also be obtained from the resin and is used for waterproofing, as a wood preservative etc. Wood - heavy, very hard, tough, strong, coarse grained, durable; It weighs 44lb per cubic foot; It is largely used for construction, pulp, interiors of buildings, masts, fencing, fuel, flooring, charcoal;
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  None
Flower Color [2]  Brown
Foliage Color [2]  Dark Green
Fruit Color [2]  Brown
Fruit Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Height [3]  98 feet (30 m)
Width [3]  16.4 feet (5 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 7 Low Temperature: 0 F° (-17.8 C°) → 10 F° (-12.2 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 10 Low Temperature: 30 F° (-1.1 C°) → 40 F° (4.4 C°)
Light Preference [2]  Full Sun
Soil Acidity [2]  Neutral
Soil Fertility [2]  Infertile
Water Use [1]  Moderate to Low
View Plants For A Future Record : Pinus palustris

Protected Areas

Emblem of

Alabama
North Carolina

Predators

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Buprestis lineata[6]
Chalcophora virginiensis[6]
Chrysobothris cribraria[6]

Range Map

Distribution

SE U.S.A., from Virginia to E Texas in the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains. TDWG: 77 TEX 78 ALA FLA GEO LOU MSI NCA SCA VRG; SE USA, from Virginia to E Texas in the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains.. TDWG: 77 TEX 78 ALA FLA GEO LOU MSI NCA SCA VRG;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
3Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Wood Janka Hardness Scale/Chart J W Morlan's Unique Wood Gifts
5Forest Inventory and Analysis DB version 5.1, May 4, 2013, U.S. Forest Service
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
8HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
9Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
10Negron, Jose F. 1995. Cone and Seed Insects Associated with Piñon Pine. In: Shaw, Douglas W.; Aldon, Earl F.; LoSapio, Carol, technical coordinators. Desired future conditions for piñon- juniper ecosystems: Proceedings of the symposium; 1994 August 8-12; Flagstaff, AZ. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-258. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 97-106.
11Patterns of Folivory and Seed Ingestion by Gopher Tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) in a Southeastern Pine Savanna, Roger D. Birkhead, Craig Guyer and Sharon M. Hermann, Am. Midl. Nat. 154:143-151
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License