Plantae > Tracheophyta > Pinopsida > Pinales > Pinaceae > Pinus > Pinus parviflora
 

Pinus parviflora (Japanese white pine; five-needle pine)

Language: Chi; Dut; Ger; Hrv, Srp; Hun; Ita; Jpn (Kanji); Jpn (Katakana); Rus

Wikipedia Abstract

Pinus parviflora, or Japanese white pine, is a pine in the white pine group, Pinus subgenus Strobus, native to Japan. It is also known as the five-needle pine or Japanese five-needle pine (Pinus pentaphylla). It is a coniferous evergreen tree, growing to 15–25 m in height and is usually as broad as it is tall, forming a wide, dense, conical crown. The leaves are needle-like, in bundles of five, with a length of 5–6 cm. The cones are 4–7 cm long, with broad, rounded scales; the seeds are 8–11 mm long, with a vestigial 2–10 mm wing.
View Wikipedia Record: Pinus parviflora

Infraspecies

Attributes

Air Quality Improvement [1]  Low
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Carbon Capture [1]  Low
Shade Percentage [1]  83 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Wind Reduction [1]  Medium
Edible [2]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Flower Type [2]  Monoecious
Hazards [2]  The wood, sawdust and resins from various species of pine can cause dermatitis in sensitive people;
Leaf Type [2]  Evergreen
Pollinators [2]  Wind
Structure [2]  Tree
Usage [2]  A tan or green dye is obtained from the needles; The needles contain a substance called terpene, this is released when rain washes over the needles and it has a negative effect on the germination of some plants, including wheat; Oleo-resins are present in the tissues of all species of pines, but these are often not present in sufficient quantity to make their extraction economically worthwhile; The resins are obtained by tapping the trunk, or by destructive distillation of the wood; In general, trees from warmer areas of distribution give the higher yields; Turpentine consists of an average of 20% of the oleo-resin; Turpentine has a wide range of uses including as a solvent for waxes etc, for making varnish, medicinal etc; Rosin is the substance left after turpentine is removed. This is used by violinists on their bows and also in making sealing wax, varnish etc; Pitch can also be obtained from the resin and is used for waterproofing, as a wood preservative etc.
Height [2]  49 feet (15 m)
Width [2]  20 feet (6 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 5 Low Temperature: -20 F° (-28.9 C°) → -10 F° (-23.3 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 7 Low Temperature: 0 F° (-17.8 C°) → 10 F° (-12.2 C°)
Water Use [1]  Moderate
View Plants For A Future Record : Pinus parviflora

Predators

Ceroplastes rubens (pink wax scale)[3]
Crisicoccus pini (Kuwana pine mealybug)[3]
Spulerina corticicola[4]

Distribution

Japan: Hokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu, Shikoku; South Korea, Utsurio-To (island). TDWG: 38 JAP-HK JAP-HN JAP-KY JAP-SH KOR-SK; Japan: Hokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu, Shikoku; South Korea, Utsurio-To (island).. TDWG: 38 JAP-HK JAP-HN JAP-KY JAP-SH KOR-SK;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
3Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
4HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License