Plantae > Tracheophyta > Pinopsida > Pinales > Pinaceae > Pinus > Pinus mugo
 

Pinus mugo (Mountain pine; dwarf mountain pine; mugo pine)

Language: Chi; Cze; Dut; Fre; Ger; Hrv, Srp; Hun; Ita; Nor; Pol; Rus; Slo; Swe

Wikipedia Abstract

Pinus mugo, known as creeping pine, dwarf mountainpine, mugo pine, mountain pine, scrub mountain pine or Swiss mountain pine, is a species of conifer, native to high elevation habitats from southwestern to Central Europe.
View Wikipedia Record: Pinus mugo

Infraspecies

Attributes

Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-Low
Screening - Summer [2]  Dense
Screening - Winter [2]  Dense
Flower Color [2]  Yellow
Foliage Color [2]  Dark Green
Fruit Color [2]  Brown
Drought Tolerance [2]  Low
Edible [3]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Fire Tolerance [2]  None
Flower Type [3]  Monoecious
Frost Free Days [2]  90 days
Growth Form [2]  Multiple Stem
Growth Period [2]  Spring, Summer
Growth Rate [2]  Slow
Hazards [3]  The wood, sawdust and resins from various species of pine can cause dermatitis in sensitive people;
Leaf Type [3]  Evergreen
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Pollinators [3]  Wind
Propagation [2]  Bare Root, Container, Cutting
Root Depth [2]  16 inches (41 cm)
Seed Spread Rate [2]  None
Seeds Per [2]  72240 / lb (159262 / kg)
Shape/Orientation [2]  Decumbent
Structure [3]  Tree
Usage [3]  A tan or green dye is obtained from the needles; The needles contain a substance called terpene, this is released when rain washes over the needles and it has a negative effect on the germination of some plants, including wheat; Trees are sometimes planted as a shelterbelt at high altitudes; There are a number of dwarf forms that are very useful for covering dry slopes and mounds; An essential oil obtained from the young twigs is used medicinally and also in woody perfumeries; Trees are planted for sand binding and shelter in N. Europe; Oleo-resins are present in the tissues of all species of pines, but these are often not present in sufficient quantity to make their extraction economically worthwhile; The resins are obtained by tapping the trunk, or by destructive distillation of the wood; In general, trees from warmer areas of distribution give the higher yields; Turpentine consists of an average of 20% of the oleo-resin; Turpentine has a wide range of uses including as a solvent for waxes etc, for making varnish, medicinal etc; Rosin is the substance left after turpentine is removed. This is used by violinists on their bows and also in making sealing wax, varnish etc; Pitch can also be obtained from the resin and is used for waterproofing, as a wood preservative etc. Wood - used to make shoes etc;
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  None
Height [3]  14.76 feet (4.5 m)
Width [3]  26 feet (8 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [2]  USDA Zone: 3 Low Temperature: -40 F° (-40 C°) → -30 F° (-34.4 C°)
Light Preference [4]  Mostly Sunny
Soil Acidity [2]  Neutral
Soil Fertility [4]  Mostly Infertile
Water Use [2]  Low
View Plants For A Future Record : Pinus mugo

Protected Areas

Predators

Distribution

Europe, in mountains from W Spain to Bulgaria and Romania TDWG: 11 AUT-AU CZE-CZ CZE-SK GER POL SWI 12 FRA-FR SPA-AN SPA-SP 13 ALB BUL ITA-IT ROM YUG-BH YUG-CR YUG-SE 14 UKR-UK; Europe, in mountains from W Spain to Bulgaria and Romania. TDWG: 11 AUT-AU CZE-CZ CZE-SK GER POL SWI 12 FRA-FR SPA-AN SPA-SP 13 ALB BUL ITA-IT ROM YUG-BH YUG-CR YUG-SE 14 UKR-UK;

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Derived from Allergy-Free Gardening OPALS™, Thomas Leo Ogren (2000)
2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
3Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Ellenberg, H., Weber, H.E., Dull, R., Wirth, V., Werner, W., Paulissen, D. (1991) Zeigerwerte von Pflanzen in Mitteleuropa. Scripta Geobotanica 18, 1–248
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
7HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
8Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
9New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
Protected Areas provided by Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License