Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Carangidae > Caranx > Caranx ruber
 

Caranx ruber (Bar jack; Skip-jack; Skipjack; Runner; Skip jack; Red jack; Rainbow crevalle; Point nose; Passing Jack; Neverbite; Jack; Greenback; Crevalli; Crevalle jack; Blue striped cavalla; Blue runner; Blackjack)

Synonyms: Carangoides ruber; Scomber ruber
Language: Creole, French; Danish; Dutch; French; Japanese; Mandarin Chinese; Papiamento; Polish; Portuguese; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The bar jack (Caranx ruber) (also known as the carbonero, red jack, blue-striped cavalla and passing jack) is a common species of inshore marine fish classified in the jack family, Carangidae. The bar jack is distributed through the western Atlantic Ocean from New Jersey and Bermuda in the north to Venezuela and possibly Brazil in the south, with the largest population in the Gulf of Mexico and West Indies. The bar jack is most simply distinguished from similar jacks by its dark horizontal bar which runs along the back and down the caudal fin, often accompanied by an electric blue stripe immediately below it. Other more detailed differences include dentition and soft ray counts. The bar jack is a moderately large species, growing to a recorded maximum of 65 cm and a weight of 6.8 kg. The s
View Wikipedia Record: Caranx ruber

Attributes

Migration [1]  Oceanodromous

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Anguilla; Antigua and Barbuda; Aruba; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northwest; Atlantic, Southeast; Atlantic, Southwest; Atlantic, Western Central; Bahamas; Barbados; Belize; Bermuda; Brazil; Caribbean Sea; Cayman Islands; Colombia; Costa Rica; Cuba; Curaçao Island; Discovery Bay; Dominica; Dominican Republic; East Brazil Shelf; Grenada; Guadeloupe; Guatemala; Gulf of Mexico; Haiti; Honduras; Jamaica; Martinique; Mexico; Montserrat; Nicaragua; North Brazil Shelf; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Panama; Puerto Rico; Saint Helena; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Lucia; Saint Vincent & the Grenadines; South Brazil Shelf; Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Trindade Island; Trinidad and Tobago; Turks and Caicos Is.; US Virgin Islands; USA (contiguous states); Venezuela; Virgin Islands (UK); Western Atlantic: New Jersey (USA), Bermuda, and Gulf of Mexico to southern Brazil; throughout the Caribbean Sea (Ref. 9626). Most common in the West Indies (Ref. 26938).;

External References

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Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
2Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
3Food Habits of Reef Fishes of the West Indies, John E. Randall, Stud. Trop. Oceanogr. 5, 665–847 (1967)
4Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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