Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Serranidae > Epinephelus > Epinephelus morio
 

Epinephelus morio (Red grouper; Hamlet; Grouper; Deer grouper; Brown grouper)

Synonyms: Serranus angustifrons; Serranus erythrogaster; Serranus morio; Serranus remotus
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Wikipedia Abstract

The Red Grouper (Epinephelus morio) is a species of fish in the Family Epinephelidae. The Red Grouper's typical range is coastal areas in the western Atlantic, stretching from southern Brazil to North Carolina in the US and including the Gulf of Mexico. This demersal, largely sedentary species has an extended (~40 day) pelagic larval stage before it settles in shallow coastal hardbottom habitat as juveniles. They remain in inshore waters for 4–5 years before migrating to offshore hardbottom habitat—particularly on the edge of the continental self—as adults. Spawning occurs offshore between January and June, peaking in May. While primarily eating benthic invertebrates, the Red Grouper is an opportunistic feeder in the reef community. The diet commonly includes xanthid and portunid crabs, ju
View Wikipedia Record: Epinephelus morio

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Predators

Mycteroperca microlepis (Velvet rockfish)[1]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Florida Aquarium
Minnesota Zoological Garden
Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo

Distribution

Anguilla; Antigua and Barbuda; Aruba; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Southwest; Atlantic, Western Central; Bahamas; Barbados; Belize; Bermuda; Brazil; Caribbean Sea; Cayman Islands; Celestún Biosphere Reserve; Colombia; Costa Rica; Cuba; Curaçao Island; Discovery Bay; Dominica; Dominican Republic; East Brazil Shelf; French Guiana; Grenada; Guadeloupe; Guatemala; Gulf of Mexico; Guyana; Haiti; Honduras; Jamaica; Martinique; Mexico; Montserrat; Netherlands Antilles; Nicaragua; North Brazil Shelf; Panama; Puerto Rico; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Lucia; Saint Vincent & the Grenadines; Sao Tomé and Principe; South Brazil Shelf; Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Suriname; Trinidad and Tobago; Turks and Caicos Is.; US Virgin Islands; USA (contiguous states); Venezuela; Virgin Islands (UK); Western Atlantic: North Carolina, USA to southern Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, and Bermuda; strays occur north to Massachusetts.;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
2Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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