Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Scombridae > Scomberomorus > Scomberomorus cavalla
 

Scomberomorus cavalla (Spanish mackerel; Kingfish; King mackerel)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The king mackerel or kingfish (Scomberomorus cavalla) is a migratory species of mackerel of the western Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. It is an important species to both the commercial and recreational fishing industries.
View Wikipedia Record: Scomberomorus cavalla

Attributes

Migration [1]  Oceanodromous

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Acanthocybium solandri (Wahoo fish)[2]
Carcharhinus longimanus (Whitetip whaler)[2]
Carcharhinus perezii (Caribbean reef shark)[2]
Carcharhinus plumbeus (Thickskin shark)[2]
Coryphaena hippurus (Mahi-mahi)[2]

Consumers

Distribution

Anguilla; Antigua and Barbuda; Aruba; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Eastern Central; Atlantic, Northwest; Atlantic, Southwest; Atlantic, Western Central; Bahamas; Barbados; Belize; Brazil; Canada; Caribbean Sea; Cayman Islands; Celestún Biosphere Reserve; China; Colombia; Costa Rica; Cuba; Curaçao Island; Dominica; Dominican Republic; East Brazil Shelf; French Guiana; Grenada; Guadeloupe; Guatemala; Gulf of Mexico; Guyana; Haiti; Honduras; Jamaica; Martinique; Mexico; Montserrat; Netherlands Antilles; Nicaragua; North Brazil Shelf; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Panama; Puerto Rico; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Lucia; Saint Paul's Rocks; Saint Vincent & the Grenadines; South Brazil Shelf; Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Suriname; Trindade Island; Trinidad and Tobago; US Virgin Islands; USA (contiguous states); Venezuela; Virgin Islands (UK); Western Atlantic: Canada (Ref. 5951) to Massachusetts, USA to São Paulo, Brazil. Eastern Central Atlantic: St. Paul's Rocks (Ref. 13121).;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
2Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
3TROPHIC RELATIONSHIPS OF DEMERSAL FISHES IN THE SHRIMPING ZONE OFF ALVARADO LAGOON, VERACRUZ, MEXICO, Edgar Peláez-Rodríguez, Jonathan Franco-López, Wilfredo A. Matamoros, Rafael Chavez-López, and Nancy J. Brown-Peterson, Gulf and Caribbean Research Vol 17, 157–167, 2005
4Food Habits of Reef Fishes of the West Indies, John E. Randall, Stud. Trop. Oceanogr. 5, 665–847 (1967)
5Food of Northwest Atlantic Fishes and Two Common Species of Squid, Ray E. Bowman, Charles E. Stillwell, William L. Michaels, and Marvin D. Grosslein, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-155 (2000)
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License