Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Anguilliformes > Anguillidae > Anguilla > Anguilla rostrata
 

Anguilla rostrata (American eel; Silver eel; Freshwater eel; Elver (joven); Eel; Common eel)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The American eel (Anguilla rostrata) is a facultative catadromous fish found on the eastern coast of North America. Eels (Anguilla spp.) are fish belonging to the elopomorph superorder, a group of phylogenetically ancient teleosts. The American eel has a slender snakelike body that is covered with a mucous layer, which makes the eel appear to be naked and slimy despite the presence of minute scales. A long dorsal fin runs from the middle of the back and is continuous with a similar ventral fin. Pelvic fins are absent, and relatively small pectoral fin can be found near the midline, followed by the head and gill-covers. Variations exist in coloration, from olive green, brown shading to greenish-yellow and light gray or white on the belly. Eels from clear water are often lighter than those f
View Wikipedia Record: Anguilla rostrata

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Anguilla rostrata

Attributes

Maximum Longevity [3]  50 years
Migration [1]  Catadromous
Speed [4]  2.423 MPH (1.083 m/s)
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams, Coastal
Adult Weight [2]  8.889 lbs (4.032 kg)
Female Maturity [3]  4 years 6 months
Male Maturity [2]  4 years 6 months

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Chesapeake Bay United States Nearctic Temperate Coastal Rivers    
Laurentian Great Lakes Canada, United States Nearctic Large Lakes    
Northeast US & Southeast Canada Atlantic Drainages Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coastal Rivers    
Sacramento - San Joaquin United States Nearctic Temperate Coastal Rivers    

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

America, North - Inland waters; America, South - Inland waters; Aruba; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northwest; Atlantic, Southwest; Atlantic, Western Central; Bahamas; Barbados; Belize; Bermuda; Canada; Caribbean Sea; Colombia; Costa Rica; Cuba; Curaçao Island; Dominica; Dominican Republic; East Brazil Shelf; Greenland; Guatemala; Gulf of Mexico; Guyana; Haiti; Honduras; Jamaica; Lake Waccamaw; Martinique; Mexico; Mississippi; Missouri; Nearctic; Neotropical; Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf; Nicaragua; North Brazil Shelf; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Northwest to western Central Atlantic: Greenland south along the Atlantic coast of Canada and the USA to Panama, and throughout much of the West Indies south to Trinidad.; Oceania - Inland waters; Panama; Penobscot Bay; Puerto Rico; Rio Grande; Saint Pierre and Miquelon; Scotian Shelf; South Brazil Shelf; Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Tennessee; Trinidad and Tobago; Turks and Caicos Is.; US Virgin Islands; USA (contiguous states); Venezuela; West Greenland Shelf;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
4Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
5Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7VII. FOOD HABITS OF THE MUMMICHOG (Fundulus heteroclitus), Frank W. Steimle, Jr., NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-167, 2001 p. 101-109
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Images provided by Wikimedia Commons licensed under a Creative Commons License
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License