Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Gadiformes > Merlucciidae > Merluccius > Merluccius bilinearis
 

Merluccius bilinearis (Whiting; Silver hake; New England hake; Hake; Atlantic hake)

Synonyms: Stomodon bilinearis
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Wikipedia Abstract

The silver hake, Atlantic hake or New England hake, Merluccius bilinearis, is a merluccid hake of the genus Merluccius, found in the northwest Atlantic Ocean. It is highly predatory and typically feeds on fish and crustaceans.
View Wikipedia Record: Merluccius bilinearis

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  2.789 lbs (1.265 kg)
Female Maturity [2]  1 year 7 months
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 7 months
Maximum Longevity [2]  12 years
Migration [3]  Oceanodromous

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Forillon National Park II 61010 Quebec, Canada  
Gateway National Recreation Area V 1807 New Jersey, United States

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

Northwest Atlantic: coast of Canada and USA from Bell Isle Channel to the Bahamas; most common from southern Newfoundland to South Carolina.;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
3Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Food of Northwest Atlantic Fishes and Two Common Species of Squid, Ray E. Bowman, Charles E. Stillwell, William L. Michaels, and Marvin D. Grosslein, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-155 (2000)
6 Steimle FW, Pikanowski RA, McMillan DG, Zetlin CA, Wilk SJ. 2000. Demersal Fish and American Lobster Diets in the Lower Hudson - Raritan Estuary. US Dep Commer, NOAA Tech Memo NMFS NE 161; 106 p.
7CephBase - Cephalopod (Octopus, Squid, Cuttlefish and Nautilus) Database
8Offshore diet of grey seals Halichoerus grypus near Sable Island, Canada, W. D. Bowen, G . D. Harrison, Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 112: 1-11, 1994
9Feeding Spectrum and Trophic Relationships of Short-finned Squid (Illex illecebrosus) in the Northwest Atlantic, Yu. M. Froerman, NAFO Sci. Coun. Studies, 7: 67-75 (1984)
10Food habits of Atlantic white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus acutus) off the coast of New England, James E. Craddock, Pamela T. Polloni, Brett Hayward, Frederick Wenzel, Fish. Bull. 107:384–394 (2009)
11Analysis of stomach contents of the porbeagle shark (Lamna nasus Bonnaterre) in the northwest Atlantic, W. N. Joyce, S. E. Campana, L. J. Natanson, N. E. Kohler, H. L. Pratt Jr, and C. F. Jensen, ICES Journal of Marine Science, 59: 1263–1269. 2002
12Food and Ontogenetic Shifts in Feeding of the Goosefish, Lophius Americanus, Michael P. Armstrong, John A. Musick, and James A. Colvocoresses, J. Northw. Atl. Fish. Sci., Vol. 18: 99–103
13THE DIET OF HARBOUR PORPOISE (PHOCOENA PHOCOENA) IN THE NORTHEAST ATLANTIC, M. B. SANTOS & G. J. PIERCE, Oceanography and Marine Biology: an Annual Review 2003, 41, 355–390
14Differences in diet of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) at five seasonal feeding grounds on the New England continental shelf, Bradford C. Chase, Fishery Bulletin 100 no2 168-80 Ap 2002
15Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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