Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Moronidae > Morone > Morone saxatilis
 

Morone saxatilis (Striper bass; Striped sea-bass; Striped sea bass; Striped bass; Rockfish; Rock)

Synonyms:
Language: Danish; Finnish; French; Italian; Mandarin Chinese; Polish; Portuguese; Russian; Spanish; Swedish

Wikipedia Abstract

The striped bass (Morone saxatilis), also called Atlantic striped bass, striper, linesider, pimpfish, rock, or rockfish, is an anadromous Perciforme fish of the Moronidae family found primarily along the Atlantic coast of North America. It has also been widely introduced into inland recreational fisheries across the United States. Striped bass found in the Gulf of Mexico are a separate strain referred to as Gulf Coast striped bass.
View Wikipedia Record: Morone saxatilis

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  6.56 feet (200 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Phyto-lithophils
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  5,000,000
Maximum Longevity [1]  30 years
Migration [3]  Anadromous
Adult Weight [2]  69.115 lbs (31.35 kg)
Diet [3]  Carnivore
Female Maturity [1]  4 years 6 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Emblem of

Maryland
New Hampshire
New York
Rhode Island
South Carolina

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Africa-Inland Waters; America, North - Inland waters; America, South - Inland waters; Argentina; Asia - Inland waters; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northwest; Atlantic, Western Central; California Current; Canada; Caspian Sea; China; Ecuador; Ethiopian; Europe - Inland waters; Gulf of Mexico; Hawaii (USA); Iran (Islamic Rep. of); Israel; Japan; Kuban River; Latvia; Mexico; Mississippi; Missouri; Nearctic; Neotropical; Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Oceania - Inland waters; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northeast; Palearctic; Rio Grande; Russian Federation; Scotian Shelf; South Africa; Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf; St. Lawrence; Turkey; USA (contiguous states); Western Atlantic: St. Lawrence River in Canada to St. John's River in northern Florida and northern Gulf of Mexico; from fresh and brackish tributaries of western Florida to Louisiana in the USA. Introduced to other countries.;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Food of Northwest Atlantic Fishes and Two Common Species of Squid, Ray E. Bowman, Charles E. Stillwell, William L. Michaels, and Marvin D. Grosslein, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-155 (2000)
6 Steimle FW, Pikanowski RA, McMillan DG, Zetlin CA, Wilk SJ. 2000. Demersal Fish and American Lobster Diets in the Lower Hudson - Raritan Estuary. US Dep Commer, NOAA Tech Memo NMFS NE 161; 106 p.
7HISTORICAL DIET ANALYSIS OF LOGGERHEAD (CARETTA CARETTA) AND KEMP’S RIDLEY (LEPIDOCHELYS KEMPI) SEA TURTLES IN VIRGINIA, Erin E. Seney, A Thesis Presented to The Faculty of the School of Marine Science The College of William and Mary in Virginia (2003)
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License