Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Salmoniformes > Salmonidae > Oncorhynchus > Oncorhynchus mykiss
 

Oncorhynchus mykiss (redband trout; Rainbow trout; Steelhead; Steelhead trout; Trout; Summer salmon; Silver trout; Salmon trout; Redband; Rainbow; Lord-fish; Kamloops trout; Kamloops; Kamchatka trout; Kamchatka steelhead; Hardhead; Kamchatka salmon; Coast range trout; Coast rainbow trout; Coast angel trout; Brown trout; Bow; Baja California rainbow trout; Baiser)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is a trout and species of salmonid native to cold-water tributaries of the Pacific Ocean in Asia and North America. The steelhead (sometimes called "steelhead trout") is an anadromous (sea-run) form of the coastal rainbow trout (O. m. irideus) or Columbia River redband trout (O. m. gairdneri) that usually returns to fresh water to spawn after living two to three years in the ocean. Freshwater forms that have been introduced into the Great Lakes and migrate into tributaries to spawn are also called steelhead.
View Wikipedia Record: Oncorhynchus mykiss

Invasive Species

Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout) are one of the most widely introduced fish species in the world. Native to western North America, from Alaska to the Baja Peninsula, Oncorhynchus mykiss have been introduced to numerous countries for sport and commercial aquaculture. Oncorhynchus mykiss is highly valued as a sportfish, with regular stocking occurring in many locations where wild populations cannot support the pressure from anglers. Concerns have been raised about the effects of introduced trout in some areas, as they may affect native fish and invertebrates through predation and competition.
View ISSG Record: Oncorhynchus mykiss

Attributes

Adult Length [2]  3.936 feet (120 cm)
Brood Dispersal [2]  Hidden
Brood Egg Substrate [2]  Lithophils (rock-gravel)
Brood Guarder [2]  No
Gestation [3]  18 days
Litter Size [2]  3,500
Maximum Longevity [2]  11 years
Migration [1]  Anadromous
Water Biome [1]  Pelagic, Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams, Temporary Pools, Coastal, Brackish Water
Adult Weight [3]  26.974 lbs (12.235 kg)
Diet [1]  Carnivore
Female Maturity [2]  4 years
Male Maturity [3]  2 years 6 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

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Ecosystems

Emblem of

California
Washington

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Afghanistan; Africa-Inland Waters; Alaska (USA); Albania; America, North - Inland waters; America, South - Inland waters; Amur; Antarctica - Inland waters; Arctic Ocean; Argentina; Armenia; Asia - Inland waters; Athi-Galana-Sabaki River Drainage System; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northeast; Atlantic, Northwest; Australia; Australian; Austria; Azores Islands; Beaufort Sea; Belgium; Bolivia; Brazil; Bulgaria; Canada; Caspian Sea; Chile; China; Chukchi Sea; Colombia; Costa Rica; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Dominican Republic; East Bering Sea; East Central Australian Shelf; Ecuador; Elbe; Eritrea; Estonia; Ethiopia; Ethiopian; Europe - Inland waters; Finland; France; Fraser; Germany, Fed. Rep.; Great Lakes; Greece; Gulf of Alaska; Guyana; Hawaii (USA); Honduras; Hungary; Iceland; India; Indian Ocean; Indian Ocean, Eastern; Indian Ocean, Western; Indonesia; Insular Pacific-Hawaiian; Iran (Islamic Rep. of); Iraq; Ireland; Israel; Issyk-Kul Lake; Italy; Japan; Jordan; Kazakhstan; Kenya; Kerguelen Islands; Korea, Republic of; Kuroshio Current; Kyrgyzstan; Lake Biwa; Latvia; Lebanon; Lesotho; Liechtenstein; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Madagascar; Madeira Islands; Malawi; Malaysia; Mauritius; Mediterranean and Black Sea; Mexico; Missouri; Morocco; Nakdong; Native to Pacific Slope from Kuskokwim River, Alaska to (at least) Rio Santa Domingo, Baja California, Mexico; upper Mackenzie River drainage (Arctic basin), Alberta and British Columbia in Canada; endorheic basins of southern Oregon, USA. Widely introduced in cold waters elsewhere in North America and rest of the world (Ref. 5723). Eastern Pacific: Kamchatkan Peninsula and have been recorded from the Commander Islands east of Kamchatka and sporadically in the Sea of Okhotsk as far south as the mouth of the Amur River along the mainland. The records outside Kamchatka probably represent migrating or straying Kamchatkan steelhead (<i>penshinensis</i>) rather than the established native population (Reg. 50080). Several countries report adverse ecological impact after introduction.; Nearctic; Nelson-Saskatchewan; Neotropical; Nepal; Netherlands; New Zealand; New Zealand Shelf; Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf; Norway; Oceania - Inland waters; Oder; Oriental; Pacific Central-American Coastal; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northeast; Pacific, Northwest; Pacific, Southwest; Pacific, Western Central; Pakistan; Palearctic; Panama; Papua New Guinea; Peru; Poland; Portugal; Red Sea; Romania; Russian Federation; Réunion; Scotian Shelf; Sea of Okhotsk; Serbia and Montenegro; Slovakia; Slovenia; Somali Coastal Current; South Africa; Southeast Australian Shelf; Southwest Atlantic: Argentina (Ref. 9086). Eastern Pacific: Kamchatkan Peninsula and have been recorded from the Commander Islands east of Kamchatka and sporadically in the Sea of Okhotsk as far south as the mouth of the Amur River along the mainland. ; Southwest Atlantic: Argentina (Ref. 9086). Eastern Pacific: Kamchatkan Peninsula and have been recorded from the Commander Islands east of Kamchatka and sporadically in the Sea of Okhotsk as far south as the mouth of the Amur River along the mainland. The records outside of Kamchatka probably represent migrating or straying Kamchatkan steelhead (<i>penshinensis</i>) rather than the established native population (Reg. 50080). One of the most widely introduced fishes, may be regarded as global in its present distribution. In the tropics restricted to areas above 1,200 m. Several countries report adverse ecological impact after introduction (Ref. 5723).; Spain; Sri Lanka; Sudan; Swaziland; Sweden; Switzerland; Syrian Arab Republic; Tahiti; Taiwan; Tanzania, United Rep. of; Thailand; Tigris; Tunisia; Turkey; USA (contiguous states); Ukraine; United Kingdom; Uruguay; Uzbekistan; Venezuela; Volga; West Bering Sea; Zambezi; Zambia; Zimbabwe;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6DIET AND CONSERVATION STATUS OF CAPE CLAWLESS OTTERS IN EASTERN ZIMBABWE, J. R. A. BUTLER and J. T. DU TOIT, IUCN Otter Spec. Group Bull. 11 1995
7Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository.
8Lontra provocax, Serge Larivière, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 610, pp. 1-4 (1999)
9Food Web Relationships of Northern Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca : a Synthesis of the Available Knowledge, Charles A. Simenstad, Bruce S. Miller, Carl F. Nyblade, Kathleen Thornburgh, and Lewis J. Bledsoe, EPA-600 7-29-259 September 1979
10Narrow-headed Gartersnake (Thamnophis rufipunctatus) Recovery Plan, Leland J. S. Pierce, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, 2007
11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
12Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Ramsar Sites Information Service
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License