Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Percidae > Perca > Perca flavescens
 

Perca flavescens (Yellow perch; Perch; Lake perch; American yellow perch; American perch)

Synonyms: Morone flavescens; Perca acuta; Perca fluviatilis flavescens; Perca notata
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Wikipedia Abstract

The yellow perch (Perca flavescens), commonly referred to as perch, is a freshwater perciform fish native to much of North America. The yellow perch was described in 1814 by Samuel Latham Mitchill from New York. Yellow perch are closely related, and morphologically similar to the European perch (Perca fluviatilis); however, the two are recognized as independent species based on anatomical and genetic differences. Other common names for yellow perch include American perch, coontail, lake perch, raccoon perch, ring-tail perch, ringed perch, and striped perch.
View Wikipedia Record: Perca flavescens

Attributes

Adult Length [2]  20 inches (50 cm)
Brood Dispersal [2]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [2]  Phyto-lithophils
Brood Guarder [2]  No
Gestation [3]  16 days
Litter Size [2]  100,000
Maximum Longevity [2]  12 years
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds
Adult Weight [3]  2.326 lbs (1.055 kg)
Diet [1]  Carnivore
Female Maturity [2]  4 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

America, North - Inland waters; Canada; Great Lakes; Lake Waccamaw; Mackenzie; Mississippi; Missouri; Nearctic; North America: Atlantic, Arctic, Great Lakes, and Mississippi River basins from Nova Scotia and Quebec west to Great Slave Lake in Northwest Territories in Canada, and south to Ohio, Illinois and Nebraska in the USA; south in Atlantic drainages to Santee; North America: Atlantic, Arctic, Great Lakes, and Mississippi River basins from Nova Scotia and Quebec west to Great Slave Lake in Northwest Territories in Canada, and south to Ohio, Illinois and Nebraska in the USA; south in Atlantic drainages to Santee River in South Carolina, USA.; Rio Grande; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
6Patterns of prey use by lesser scaup Aythya affinis (Aves) and diet overlap with fishes during spring migration, Kimberly A. Strand, Steven R. Chipps, Sharon N. Kahara, Kenneth F. Higgins, Spencer Vaa, Hydrobiologia (2008) 598:389–398
7A quantitative comparison between diet and body fatty acid composition in wild northern pike (Esox lucius L.), Karl Schwalme, Fish Physiology and Biochemistry vol. 10 no. 2 pp 91-98 (1992)
8Diet of the Double-Crested Cormorant in Western Lake Erie, Michael T. Bur, Sandra L. Tinnirello, Charles D. Lovell, Jeff T. Tyson, USDA National Wildlife Research Center Symposia, 1997
9Feeding Ecology and Nesting Success of Forster's Terns on Lake Osakis, Minnesota, Gail Fraser, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1994
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
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