Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Salmoniformes > Salmonidae > Salvelinus > Salvelinus alpinus
 

Salvelinus alpinus (Arctic charr; Char; Ilkalupik; Mountain trout; Salmon trout)

Synonyms:
Language: Danish; French; German; Italian; Portuguese; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

Arctic char or Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) is a cold-water fish in the family Salmonidae, native to alpine lakes and arctic and subarctic coastal waters. Its distribution is circumpolar. It breeds in fresh water, and populations can either be landlocked, remaining in fresh water for their entire life cycle, or anadromous, where they return from the ocean to their fresh water birth rivers to breed. No other freshwater fish is found as far north; it is, for instance, the only fish species in Lake Hazen on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic. It is one of the rarest fish species in Britain, found mainly in deep, cold, glacial lakes, and is at risk from acidification. In other parts of its range, such as the Nordic countries, it is much more common, and is fished extensively. In Sibe
View Wikipedia Record: Salvelinus alpinus

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  12 inches (31 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Lithophils (rock-gravel)
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  6,000
Maximum Longevity [1]  40 years
Migration [2]  Anadromous
Diet [2]  Carnivore
Female Maturity [1]  9 years
Male Maturity [3]  9 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Universeum Science Center

Range Map

Distribution

Asia - Inland waters; Atlantic Ocean; Europe - Inland waters; Former USSR - Inland waters; France; Lake Baikal; Palearctic; Russian Federation; Spain; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Food web topology and parasites in the pelagic zone of a subarctic lake, Per-Arne Amundsen, Kevin D. Lafferty, Rune Knudsen, Raul Primicerio, Anders Klemetsen and Armand M. Kuris, Journal of Animal Ecology 2009, 78, 563–572
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License