Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Istiophoridae > Kajikia > Kajikia audax
 

Kajikia audax (Stripey; Striped swordfish; Striped marlin; Spikefish; Spearfish; Pacific striped marlin; New Zealand marlin; Marlin; Beakie; Beak; Barred marlin; Marlín)

Synonyms:
Language: Afrikaans; Arabic; Bikol; Carolinian; Danish; Dutch; Fijian; Finnish; French; German; Hawaiian; Italian; Japanese; Korean; Malay; Mandarin Chinese; Maori; Misima-Paneati; Norwegian; Polish; Portuguese; Russian; Samoan; Sinhalese; Somali; Spanish; Swahili; Swedish; Tongan; Vietnamese; Visayan

Wikipedia Abstract

The striped marlin, Kajikia audax, is a small species of marlin found in tropical to temperate Indo-Pacific oceans not far from the surface. It is a desirable commercial and game fish with a record weight (in 1982) of 190 kg (420 lb) and a maximum length of 4.2 m (13.8 ft). The striped marlin is a predator that hunts during the day in the top 100 metres or so of the water column, often near the surface. One of their chief prey is sardines.
View Wikipedia Record: Kajikia audax

Attributes

Migration [1]  Oceanodromous
Speed [2]  50.331 MPH (22.5 m/s)

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Archipelago de Colon Biosphere Reserve 34336011 Galapagos Islands, Ecuador  

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Distribution

Agulhas Current; American Samoa; Andaman Island; Andaman Sea; Angola; Arabian Sea; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Southeast; Australia; Bangladesh; Bay of Bengal; California Current; Cambodia; Chagos Islands; Chile; Christmas Island (Aust.); Colombia; Comoros; Cook Islands; Coral Sea and GBR; Costa Rica; Djibouti; East Central Australian Shelf; East China Sea; Ecuador; El Salvador; Eritrea; Fiji Islands; French Polynesia; Galapagos Islands; Great Barrier Reef; Guam; Guatemala; Gulf of Aden; Gulf of Oman; Gulf of Thailand; Hawaii (USA); Honduras; Humboldt Current; India; Indian Ocean; Indian Ocean, Eastern; Indian Ocean, Western; Indo-Pacific: tropical, subtropical and temperate waters. Highly migratory species, Annex I of the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea (Ref. 26139). The distribution in the Pacific Ocean is unique among billfishes and tunas in that it forms a horsesh; Indo-Pacific: tropical, subtropical and temperate waters. Highly migratory species, Annex I of the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea (Ref. 26139). The distribution in the Pacific Ocean is unique among billfishes and tunas in that it forms a horseshoe-shaped pattern from the northwest Pacific through the eastern Pacific to the southwest Pacific (Ref. 30443). In the Indian Ocean, fish are more densely distributed in equatorial regions with higher concentrations off eastern Africa, in the western Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal and off northwestern Australia (Ref. 30444).; Indo-Pacific: tropical, subtropical and temperate waters. Highly migratory species, Annex I of the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea (Ref. 26139). .The distribution in the Pacific Ocean is unique among billfishes and tunas in that it forms a horseshoe-shaped pattern from the northwest Pacific through the eastern Pacific to the southwest Pacific (Ref. 30443). In the Indian Ocean, fish are more densely distributed in equatorial regions with higher concentrations off eastern Africa, in the western Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal and off northwestern Australia (Ref. 30444).; Indonesia; Indonesian Sea; Insular Pacific-Hawaiian; Iran (Islamic Rep. of); Japan; Kenya; Kiribati; Korea, Republic of; Kuril Islands; Kuroshio Current; Lagonoy Gulf; Madagascar; Malaysia; Maldives; Marquesas Islands; Marshall Islands; Mauritius; Mexico; Micronesia,Fed.States of; Milne Bay; Mozambique; Myanmar; New Caledonia; New Zealand; New Zealand Shelf; Nicaragua; North Australian Shelf; North Marianas; Oman; Oyashio Current; Pacific Central-American Coastal; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northwest; Pacific, Southeast; Pacific, Southwest; Pacific, Western Central; Pakistan; Palau; Panama; Papua New Guinea; Persian Gulf; Peru; Peru-Galapagos Waters; Philippines; Polynesian Waters; Red Sea; Ryukyu Islands; Réunion; Samoa; Sea of Japan; Seychelles; Singapore; Solomon Islands; Somali Coastal Current; Somalia; South Africa; South China Sea; Southwest Australian Shelf; Southwest Chilean Waters; Sri Lanka; Sulu-Celebes Sea; Tahiti; Taiwan; Tanzania, United Rep. of; Tasman Sea; Thailand; Tokelau; Tonga; Tuamoto Islands; Tuvalu; USA (contiguous states); Vanuatu; Viet Nam; Wake Island; West Central Australian Shelf; Yellow Sea; Yemen;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
2Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4Food habits and energy values of prey of striped marlin, Tetrapturus audax, off the coast of Mexico, Leonardo A. Abitia-Cardenas, Felipe Galvan-Magaña, Jesus Rodriguez-Romero, Fishery Bulletin 95(2). 1997, p. 360-368
5Feeding ecology and niche segregation in oceanic top predators off eastern Australia, Jock W. Young, Matt J. Lansdell, Robert A. Campbell, Scott P. Cooper, Francis Juanes, Michaela A. Guest, Mar Biol (2010) 157:2347–2368
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
7Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License