Animalia > Chordata > Elasmobranchii > Carcharhiniformes > Carcharhinidae > Carcharhinus > Carcharhinus leucas
 

Carcharhinus leucas (Zambezi shark; Swan river whaler shark; Swan River whaler; Shark; River whaler shark; River whaler; Requin bouledogue; Hervey Bay whaler shark; Ground shark; Freshwater whaler; Estuary whaler shark; Estuary shark; Cub shark; Bullshark; Bull shark)

Synonyms:
Language: Afrikaans; Bunuba; Danish; Dutch; Fang; Fijian; Finnish; Fon GBE; French; Galoa; German; Japanese; Javanese; Khmer; Malagasy; Malay; Mandarin Chinese; Nyikina; Other; Persian; Polish; Portuguese; Samoan; Sena; Serbian; Spanish; Swedish; Tagalog; Thai; Turkish; Vietnamese; Walmajarri

Wikipedia Abstract

The Bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas), also known as the Zambezi shark or, unofficially, as Zambi in Africa and Nicaragua shark in Nicaragua, is a Requiem shark commonly found worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. The bull shark is known for its aggressive nature, predilection for warm shallow water, and presence in brackish and freshwater systems including estuaries and rivers. Unlike the River sharks of the genus Glyphis, Bull sharks are not true freshwater sharks, despite their ability to survive in freshwater habitats.
View Wikipedia Record: Carcharhinus leucas

Attributes

Litter Size [2]  10
Maximum Longevity [2]  32 years
Migration [1]  Amphidromous
Water Biome [1]  Reef, Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams, Coastal
Adult Weight [2]  383.772 lbs (174.075 kg)
Female Maturity [2]  18 years
Male Maturity [2]  17 years 3 months

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Acanthocybium solandri (Wahoo fish)10

Predators

Carcharhinus leucas (Zambezi shark)[4]

Consumers

Distribution

Aldabra Special Reserve; Widespread in warm oceans, rivers and lakes. Western Atlantic: Massachusetts, USA to Argentina (Ref 58839). Eastern Atlantic: Morocco, Senegal to Angola. Indo-Pacific: Kenya and South Africa to India, then, Viet Nam to Australia; southern Baja California, Mexico to Ecuador and possibly occurring in Peru. Sympatric with <i>Carcharhinus amboinensis</i>, <i>Glyphis gangeticus</i>.; Widespread in warm oceans, rivers and lakes. Western Atlantic: Massachusetts, USA to Argentina (Ref. 58839). Eastern Atlantic: Morocco, Senegal to Angola (Ref. 81283). Indo-Pacific: Kenya and South Africa to India, then, Viet Nam to Australia; southern Baja California, Mexico to Ecuador and possibly occurring in Peru. Sympatric with <i>Carcharhinus amboinensis</i>, <i>Glyphis gangeticus</i>.;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Fish diets and food webs in the Swan–Canning estuary, River Science July 2009, Department of Water, Government of Western Australia
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Food-Web Structure and Dynamics of Eastern Tropical Pacific Coral Reefs: Panamá and Galápagos Islands, Peter W. Glynn, Food Webs and the Dynamics of Marine Reefs, eds. Tim R. McClanahan & George M. Branch, p. 185-208 (2008)
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License